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Annual Report 2017

Thirty Years Strong in the Fight to #StopSuicide

"In 2017, AFSP celebrated its 30th anniversary which provided an opportunity to look back and an opportunity to look ahead at the impact we can make throughout the country. The future clearly lies in expanding our efforts in communities."

Click here to read a message from AFSP's CEO, Robert Gebbia, and AFSP National Board Chair, Steve Siple.

Growing Our Suicide Prevention Community

4 Research Connection Events
34 State and Federal Capitol Days
41 New Interactive Screening Program Sites
80 Chapter Fundraising Events
341 International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day Events
558 Out of the Darkness Walks
1745 School and Community Education Programs
2806 Total Events Worldwide

Our AFSP Stories From 2017

Project 2025: Leading the Fight to Reduce the Suicide Rate

The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention has set a bold goal to reduce the rate of suicide in the United States by the year 2025. We’ve launched Project 2025 to help us attain that goal.

Thanks to our investments in science, we know more about how to prevent suicide than ever before. Through collaborations with other organizations, accrediting bodies, professional associations, and leaders in other industry sectors, AFSP is focusing its prevention efforts on the kinds of programs, policies and interventions that will save the most lives in the shortest amount of time.

Recognizing Our 2017 Achievements

Federal Advocacy Forum and Allies in Action

The Annual Advocacy Forum is AFSP’s largest effort to educate federal officials about mental health and suicide prevention. This past June, 230 volunteer advocates and staff from all 50 states joined us in our nation’s capital to ask all 535 members of Congress for their support on suicide prevention and mental health priorities.

Our keynote speakers for the event were former Senior White House officials David Axelrod and Karl Rove, two men from both sides of the aisle who discussed their personal experiences with suicide loss.

We also took the opportunity to recognize leaders in suicide prevention public policy at our annual Allies in Action awards ceremony. The following awardees were honored:

Want to see more from our Chapter Leadership Conference? View more photos.

Chapter Leadership Conference

The fight to stop suicide starts in our communities, at the ground level.

AFSP’s chapters carry out our mission locally. Led by people who live in and know the needs of each area, our chapter volunteers help us deliver education and prevention programs to schools and businesses, provide caring support to survivors of suicide loss, advocate for smart public policy, and organize events to raise awareness and funds for suicide prevention.

Nothing we do would be possible without our chapter volunteers. Organized around the theme of 30 Years Strong, AFSP’s Chapter Leadership Conference, held in Irvine, California recognized the milestones AFSP accomplished toward its mission to save lives and bring hope to those affected by suicide.

The three-day event enabled staff and volunteers from each of our 85 chapters to gather, share their experiences, and learn and be inspired by each other, as we looked forward to the year ahead.

Want to see more from our Chapter Leadership Conference? View more photos.

Lifesavers Gala

The 29th Annual Lifesavers Gala was an inspiring night commemorating AFSP’s 30 years together, and featuring distinguished guests and honorees who have dedicated themselves to suicide prevention.

The evening was hosted by actor and comedian Chris Gethard, whose acclaimed one-man show and HBO special Career Suicide recounted his own personal experience with suicidal thoughts, and chaired by Kabir Nath, President & CEO, Otsuka North America Pharmaceutical Business Division Otsuka America, Inc.

Throughout the night, Gethard spoke touchingly – yet with quite a bit of humor – about his personal and professional journey of having opened up about his struggles with mental health, and how no one should feel hesitant to reach out for help.

This year’s Gala, held in in New York City at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Appel Room, raised more than $530,000 for the fight against suicide.

The night featured remarks from the following award winners:

  • Research Award Winner Dr. Joan Asarnow, who has dedicated her career to developing, testing, and implementing evidence-based treatments for adolescents at risk for suicide in emergency department and primary care settings
  • Survivor Award Winner Allison Schmitt, an eight-time Olympic medal swimmer and three-time Olympian who lost her cousin to suicide and has now devoted her time and energy to being vocal about her loss and her own experiences with depression
  • Public Service Award Winner Instagram, presented by Elyse Fox, founder of the popular online community Sad Girls Club, and accepted by Instagram’s global head of marketing Cliff Hopkins, who spoke of the new tools introduced to the app this year that help connect those in need with help

Want to see more from the Lifesavers Gala? View more photos.

Shaping the Conversation in Media and Entertainment

Ways You Can Get Involved

2017 AFSP Financials

More than 84 percent of all expenses went directly to programs (well above industry standard)

We reached our five year goal of reaching $25M in revenue in just three years

We doubled our revenue in only 4 years

The financial results this year are a reflection of our continual transformation and growth. The above are a few highlights from our most recent audit. For complete audited financial statements, including auditor's notes, click here or call (212) 363-3500.

AFSP Leadership

Executive Committee

  • Steve Siple, Chair of the Board
  • Jerrold Rosenbaum, M.D., President
  • Gretchen Haas, Ph.D., Vice President
  • James Compton, Secretary
  • Alan Weeks, Treasurer
  • Yeates Conwell, M.D., Chair, Scientific Council
  • Dennis Tackett, Chair, Loss and Healing Council
  • Nancy Farrell, M.P.A., Chair of the Policy Council
  • Mary Weiler, Chair, Chapter Leadership Council
  • Ray Paul Jr., Chair, Development
  • Marco Taglietti, M.D., Chair Governance / Nominating Committee
  • Robert Gebbia, Chief Executive Officer
  • Christine Moutier, M.D., Chief Medical Officer

Board of Directors

  • Steve Siple, BBVA Compass
  • Jerry Rosenbaum, M.D., Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Gretchen Haas, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
  • James Compton, United Airlines
  • Alan Weeks
  • Michael Ballard
  • Philip Chappell, Pfizer Inc.
  • Yeates Conwell, M.D., University of Rochester
  • Dwight L. Evans, M.D., University of Pennsylvania
  • Christopher Epperson
  • Nancy Farrell, MPA, Regina Villa Associates
  • John Greden M.D., University of Michigan
  • Richard B. Kirchhoff, DDS
  • J. John Mann M.D., Columbia University Medical Center
  • Charles B. Nemeroff M.D., Ph.D., University of Miami
  • Philip T. Ninan, M.D.
  • Maria Oquendo, M.D., University of Pennsylvania
  • Ray Paul, Jr.
  • Kelly Posner, Ph.D., Columbia University Medical Center
  • Andra Press, Herbert Adelman Foundation
  • Andrew Rogoff, Pepper Hamilton, LLP
  • Phillip Satow, The Jed Foundation
  • Andrew Slaby, M.D., Ph.D., MPH, New York University Medical School
  • Lawrence Sprung, Mitlin Financial Inc.
  • Dennis Tackett
  • Marco Taglietti, Scynexis, Inc.
  • Mary Weiler

Pro Bono Legal Counsel

  • George D. Richardson, Esq., Sullivan & Worcester LLP
  • Michael J. Student, Esq., Sullivan & Worcester LLP

Executive Staff

  • Robert Gebbia, Chief Executive Officer
  • Christine Moutier, M.D., Chief Medical Officer

Senior Management

  • Stephanie Coggin, Vice President of Communications & Marketing
  • Jill Harkavy-Friedman, Ph.D., Vice President of Research
  • Daniel Killpack, Vice President of Finance and Administration
  • Michael Lamma, Vice President of Development and Field Management
  • John Madigan, Vice President of Public Policy
  • Doreen Marshall, Ph.D., Vice President of Programs

Senior Field Management

  • Mary Jean Coleman, MSW, Senior Director, Southern Division
  • Janice Hurtado Aeppli, Senior Director, Central Division
  • Valerie Kovacovich, Senior Director, Western Division
  • Melanie Varady, Senior Director, Eastern Division

Finance Committee

  • Alan Weeks, Chair
  • Gretchen Haas
  • Robert Nau
  • Andrew Rogoff
  • Marc Segel
  • Lawrence Sprung
  • Chris Tackett
  • Robert Gebbia, Chief Executive Officer
  • Daniel Killpack, Vice President of Finance and Administration

Governance/Nominating Committee

  • Marco Taglietti, M.D., Chair
  • J. John Mann, M.D.
  • Andrew Rogoff, Esq.
  • Andrew Slaby, M.D., Ph.D., MPH
  • Robert Gebbia, Chief Executive Officer
  • Christine Moutier, M.D., Chief Medical Officer

Chapter Leadership Council

  • Mary Weiler, Chair, North Dakota
  • Taryn Aiken, Utah
  • Gage Donahue, Kentucky
  • Gordon Doughty, California
  • Christopher Epperson, Arkansas
  • Susan Kelleher, Virginia
  • Michael Lamma, Vice President of Development and Field Management

Public Policy Council

  • Nancy Farrell, Chair, Massachusetts
  • Richard Kirchhoff, Vice-Chair, Illinois
  • Michael Ballard, Virginia
  • Catherine Barber, Massachusetts
  • Gordon Doughty, California
  • Carol Graham, New Jersey
  • Che Hernandez, California
  • David Jobes, Ph.D., ABPP, District of Columbia
  • Steve Moore, Illinois
  • Philip Ninan, M.D., North Carolina
  • Bruce Shahbaz, Virginia
  • Tyler West, Arkansas
  • Robert Gebbia, Chief Executive Officer
  • John Madigan, Vice President of Public Policy

Loss & Healing Council

  • Dennis Tackett, Chair, North Carolina
  • Erika Barber, Illinois
  • Mary Anne Burke, Virginia
  • Diane Gillen, Georgia
  • Shirley Kaminsky, RN, BSN, California
  • Sue Klebold, Colorado
  • Mo Krausman, Florida
  • Peggy Marshall, Texas
  • Briana Megid, California
  • Marianne Reid Schrom, New York
  • Joan Schweizer Hoff, Oregon
  • Blake Simons, California
  • Robert Stohr, California
  • Jason Tompkins, Florida
  • John R. Jordan, Ph.D., Professional Advisor
  • Christine Moutier, M.D., Chief Medical Officer
  • Doreen Marshall, Ph.D., Vice President of Programs

Scientific Council

  • Maria Oquendo, M.D., Chair, University of Pennsylvania
  • Yeates Conwell, M.D.+, Vice Chair, University of Rochester
  • Joan Asarnow, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles
  • Gregory Brown, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
  • William Coryell, M.D., University of Iowa
  • Dwight L. Evans, M.D., University of Pennsylvania
  • John F. Greden, M.D., University of Michigan
  • Gretchen Haas, Ph.D., Vice President, University of Pittsburgh
  • David Jobes, Ph.D., The Catholic University of America
  • Gary Kennedy, M.D.+, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • J. John Mann, M.D., Columbia University Medical Center
  • Peter M. Marzuk, M.D., Weill Cornell Medical College
  • Charles B. Nemeroff, M.D., Ph.D., University of Miami
  • Jerrold Rosenbaum, M.D., President, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Alan Schatzberg, M.D., Stanford University
  • Katherine Shear, M.D., Columbia University School of Social Work
  • Myrna Weissman, Ph.D., Columbia University Medical Center
  • Jan Fawcett, M.D., University of New Mexico
  • Robert Hirschfeld, M.D. (Honorary Member), Weill Cornell Medical College, NY
  • David Shaffer, M.D. (Honorary Member), Columbia University Medical Center
  • Robert Gebbia, Chief Executive Officer
  • Christine Moutier, M.D., Chief Medical Officer
  • Jill Harkavy-Friedman, Ph.D.+, Vice President of Research
  • Doreen Marshall, Ph.D., Vice President of Programs

Scientific Advisors

  • Howard Aizenstein, M.D., Ph.D., University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center
  • Schahram Akbarian, M.D., Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY
  • John Alpert, M.D., Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Larry Alphs, M.D., Ph.D., Ortho-McNeil Janssen
  • Alan Apter, M.D., Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Israel
  • Victoria Arango, Ph.D., Columbia University Medical Center
  • Amelia M. Arria, Ph.D., University of Maryland
  • Joan Asarnow, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles
  • Annette Beautrais, Ph.D., Christchurch School of Medicine, New Zealand
  • Aaron T. Beck, M.D., University of Pennsylvania
  • Francine Benes, M.D., Harvard University
  • Marian Betz, M.D., MPH, University of Colorado, Denver
  • Robert Bossarte, Ph.D., West Virginia University
  • Edwin Boudreaux, Ph.D., University Of Massachusetts Medical Center
  • Charles Bowden, M.D., University of Texas, San Antonio
  • Judith Bradford, Ph.D., Fenway Institute
  • David A. Brent, M.D., University of Pittsburgh
  • Jeffrey Bridge, Ph.D.+, Ohio State University
  • C. Hendricks Brown, Ph.D., University of Miami
  • Gregory Brown, Ph.D., University Of Pennsylvania School Of Medicine
  • Margit Burmeister, Ph.D.+, University of Michigan
  • Joseph Calabrese, M.D., Case Western Reserve University, OH
  • Gabrielle Carlson, M.D., SUNY Stony Brook University, NY
  • Helen Christensen, Ph.D., Black Dog Institute, Australia
  • Emil Coccaro, M.D., University of Chicago
  • Katherine Comtois, Ph.D., University of Washington, WA
  • Kenneth Conner, Psy.D., MPH, University of Rochester, NY
  • Yeates Conwell, M.D.+, University Of Rochester Medical Center
  • Edwin H. Cook Jr., M.D., University of Illinois, Chicago
  • William Coryell, M.D., University Of Iowa
  • Scott Crow, M.D., University of Minnesota
  • Glenn Currier, M.D., MPH, University of South Florida
  • Anthony R. D’Augelli, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
  • J. Raymond DePaulo Jr., M.D., Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
  • Brian Draper, M.D., University of New South Wales
  • Yogesh Dwivedi, Ph.D.+, University of Alabama School of Medicine
  • Andrew Dwork, M.D., Columbia University Medical Center
  • Elke Eckert, M.D., University of Minnesota
  • Michael Eddleston, Ph.D., University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • Annette Erlangsen, Ph.D., National Centre for Register-based Research, Denmark
  • Christianne Esposito-Smythers, Ph.D.+, George Mason University
  • Dwight Evans, M.D., University Of Pennsylvania School Of Medicine
  • Maurizio Fava, M.D., Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Jan Fawcett, M.D., University of New Mexico School of Medicine
  • David Fergusson, Ph.D., Christchurch School of Medicine, New Zealand
  • Max Fink, M.D., SUNY Stony Brook University
  • Prudence Fisher, Ph.D., Columbia University Medical Center
  • Thomas Franke, Ph.D., NYU School Of Medicine
  • Steven Garlow, M.D., Ph.D., Emory University
  • David Goldston, Ph.D.+, Duke University
  • Frederick K. Goodwin, M.D., George Washington University Medical Center
  • Evian Gordon, Ph.D., Brain Resource Ltd.
  • Madelyn S. Gould, Ph.D., MPH, Columbia University Medical Center
  • Jon Grant, M.D., J.D., MPH, University of Minnesota
  • John Greden, M.D., University Of Michigan
  • Laurence Greenhill, M.D., Columbia University Medical Center
  • John Gunderson, M.D., McLean Hospital, Harvard University
  • David Gunnell, Ph.D., University of Bristol, England
  • Gretchen Haas, Ph.D., University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center
  • Robert Hirschfeld, M.D., University of Texas Medical Branch
  • Paul Holinger, M.D., Rush-Presbyterian, Chicago
  • Marjan Holloway, Ph.D., Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
  • Thomas Hyde, M.D., Ph.D., National Institute of Mental Health
  • Dan Iosifescu, M.D., Mt. Sinai Hospital
  • Erkki Isometsa, L.T., University Of Helsinki, Finland
  • David Jobes, Ph.D., The Catholic University of America
  • Richard Jope, Ph.D, University Of Miami
  • Lewis Judd, M.D., University of California, San Diego
  • Nav Kapur, M.D., University of Manchester, England
  • John Kasckow, M.D., Ph.D., University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center
  • Ira Katz, M.D., Ph.D., U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Mark S. Kaplan, Dr.P.H., UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs
  • Martin Keller, M.D., Brown University/Butler Hospital
  • Gary Kennedy, M.D.+, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • James Kennedy, M.D.+, Chair, Research Grants Committee, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Canada
  • Murad M. Khan, M.D., Aga Khan University, Pakistan
  • Cheryl King, Ph.D., University of Michigan
  • Joel E. Kleinman, M.D., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins-Lieber Center
  • Kerry Knox, Ph.D., University of Rochester, NY
  • Gregory Larkin, M.D., South Auckland Clinical School, New Zealand
  • Yan Leykin, Ph.D., Palo Alto University, CA
  • Jeffrey Lieberman, M.D., Columbia University Medical Center
  • Jouko Lönnqvist, M.D., Ph.D., National Public Health Institute, Finland
  • Kevin Malone, M.D., MRCPI, MRC.Psych., St. Vincent’s University Hospital, Ireland
  • J. John Mann, M.D., New York State Psychiatric Institute
  • Sanjay Mathew, M.D., Baylor College of Medicine
  • Peter Marzuk, M.D., Weill Cornell Medical College
  • Elizabeth McCauley, Ph.D., University of Washington, WA
  • Francis McMahon, M.D., National Institute of Mental Health
  • Lars Mehlum, M.D., Ph.D., University of Oslo, Norway
  • Nadine Melhem, Ph.D., MPH, University of Pittsburgh
  • Herbert Y. Meltzer, M.D.+, Northwestern University
  • Ivan Miller, Ph.D., Brown University
  • Matthew Miller, M.D., MPH, Sc.D., Harvard School of Public Health
  • David Mischoulon, M.D., Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Ann Mitchell, Ph.D, R.N., University Of Pittsburgh School Of Nursing
  • Charles Nemeroff, M.D., Ph.D., University Of Miami School Of Medicine
  • David Nielsen, Ph.D., Baylor College of Medicine
  • Andrew Nierenberg, M.D., Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Matthew Nock, Ph.D., Harvard University, MA
  • Merete Nordentoft, Ph.D., University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Charles P. O’Brien, M.D., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
  • Rory O’Connor, Ph.D., University of Stirling, Scotland
  • Lydia O’Donnell, Ed.D., Education Development Center
  • Mark Olfson, M.D., MPH+, Columbia University Medical Center
  • Maria Oquendo, M.D., University of Pennsylvania
  • Gregory Ordway, Ph.D.+, Quillen College of Medicine, TN
  • James Overholser, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University
  • Ghanshyam Pandey, Ph.D., University of Illinois Chicago
  • Jose Pardo, M.D., Ph.D., University of Minnesota
  • Ramin Parsey, M.D., Ph.D., Stony Brook University, NY
  • Jane Pearson, Ph.D., National Institute of Mental Health
  • Cynthia Pfeffer, M.D., Weill Cornell Medical College
  • Michael R. Phillips, M.D., Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine
  • Jane Pirkis, Ph.D., University of Melbourne, Australia
  • Anthony Pisani, Ph.D.+, University Of Rochester Medical Center
  • Kelly Posner, Ph.D., Columbia University Medical Center
  • James B. Potash, M.D., MPH+, University of Iowa
  • Johanne Renaud, M.D., McGill University, Canada
  • Kerry Ressler, M.D., Ph.D., McLean Hospital/Harvard University
  • Charles Reynolds, III, M.D., University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center
  • Steven Romano, M.D., Pfizer Inc.
  • Jerrold Rosenbaum, M.D., Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Alec Roy, M.D., Department of Veterans Affairs, Psychiatry Service
  • David Rudd, Ph.D., University of Utah
  • Dan Rujescu, M.D., Ph.D., Dr. Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany
  • Stephen Russell, Ph.D., University of Arizona
  • Moira Rynn, M.D., Duke University
  • Ihsan Salloum, M.D., University of Miami
  • Ronald Salomon, M.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
  • Larry Siever, M.D., Mount Sinai School of Medicine
  • Naomi Simon, M.D., M.Sc., New York University
  • Andrew Slaby, M.D., Ph.D., MPH, New York University Medical School
  • Jair C. Soares, M.D., University of Texas Medical School at Houston
  • Paul Soloff, M.D., University of Pittsburgh
  • Anthony Spirito, Ph.D., Brown University
  • Barbara Stanley, Ph.D., Columbia University Medical Center
  • Craig Stockmeier, Ph.D., University of Mississippi Medical Center
  • Katalin Szántó, M.D., University of Pittsburgh
  • Michael Thase, M.D., University of Pennsylvania
  • Elaine Thompson, Ph.D., University of Washington
  • Gustavo Turecki, M.D., Ph.D., McGill University, Canada
  • Mark Underwood, Ph.D., Columbia University Medical Center
  • Robert Valuck, Ph.D., University of Colorado
  • Helena Verdeli, Ph.D., Teachers College/Columbia University
  • Lakshmi Vijayakumar, M.D., SNEHA and Voluntary Health Services, India
  • Margda Waern, M.D., Ph.D., University of Gothenburg
  • John Walkup, M.D.+, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
  • Danuta Wasserman, M.D., Karolinska Institute, Sweden
  • Myrna Weissman, Ph.D., Columbia University Medical Center
  • Amy Wenzel, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
  • Holly Wilcox, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins School Of Public Health
  • Virginia Willour, Ph.D., University Of Iowa
  • Peter Wyman, Ph.D., University of Rochester, NY
  • Eric Youngstrom, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Deborah Yurgelun-Todd, Ph.D.+, University of Utah
  • John M. Zajecka, M.D., Rush-Presbyterian, Chicago
  • Gil Zalsman, M.D., Tel Aviv University, Israel
  • Carlos Zarate, M.D., National Institute Of Mental Health
  • Sidney Zisook, M.D., University of California, San Diego

+ Denotes Member of the Research Grants Committee

Our Donors Make Our Mission Possible

Founders ($50,000+)

  • The Allergan Foundation
  • James M. Foote
  • Leon Lowenstein Foundation, Inc.
  • Otsuka America Pharmaceutical Inc.
  • Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene
  • Elsa Stamatopoulou Robbins and Bruce Robbins
  • Sunovion
  • Wasily Family Foundation

Benefactors ($25,000-$49,999)

  • Janssen
  • Sue Klebold
  • Henry Louis
  • McKinsey & Company
  • National Council For Behavioral Health
  • Ray Paul, Jr.
  • The Herbert Adelman Foundation
  • Andrew Rogoff
  • Jed David Satow Family Foundation
  • SC Johnson Giving

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Kay Adler
  • Advanced Clinical
  • Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld, LLP
  • Alkermes, Inc.
  • Allergan
  • Raymond Burke
  • Marian and James Cohen
  • James Compton
  • Luke Connelly
  • Lynn and William Cooper
  • Fred Craves Foundation
  • Curo Financial Technologies Corp.
  • Estate of Edith C. Borden
  • RoseMary Fuss
  • Global Cloud
  • INC Research
  • John Burns Construction Company
  • Kulynych Family Foundation II, Inc.
  • Latham & Watkins LLP
  • The Leibowitz and Greenway Family Charitable Foundation
  • Lundbeck LLC
  • Marketeching, a W2O Company
  • Azalea Martin
  • Meyer & Pepa Gold Family Foundation
  • MKM Foundation
  • MTS Partners
  • Newton South High School
  • Pat Orrino
  • Pepper Hamilton LLP
  • Pfizer Inc.
  • Polly Levee Charitable Trust
  • PriceWaterhouseCoopers LLP
  • Rawson Family Charitable Foundation
  • Donna and Phillip Satow
  • SCYNEXIS, Inc.
  • Simple Actions Family Foundation
  • Andrew Slaby
  • Marco Taglietti
  • Frederick and Margaret L. Weyerhaeuser Foundation
  • Winston & Strawn LLP
  • Jack J. Wright, Gustavo A. Galindo & Juan Pablo Galindo

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Simone Ajo
  • American International Group
  • The Peter and Carmen Lucia Buck Foundation
  • Michael Ballard
  • Jane Bennett
  • Burroughs Wellcome Fund
  • Westford Friends of Recreation, Inc.
  • Norman Carley
  • Hardy W. Chan
  • Elinor Cohen
  • Yeates Conwell
  • Gerard Dever
  • Digital Federal Credit Union
  • David & Frances Eberhart Foundation
  • Family Office Foundation
  • Nancy Farrell
  • FCB New York
  • Maureen Flannery
  • Flash Pointe Dance
  • Frontline Graphics Inc.
  • Stevie Geder Memorial Golf Tournament
  • Instagram
  • Isle of Capri Community Aces Fund
  • The Alan K. and Cledith M. Jennings Foundation
  • John Kernohan Memorial Fund Inc.
  • Catherine and Leonard Langlais
  • Samantha Lavoie
  • Charles Layman
  • Liberty Mutual Give With Liberty Program
  • Manheim Statesville
  • Mary Jo Marron
  • Maryville High School
  • Massachusetts Coalition of Police
  • MathWorks
  • The Monaghan Foundation
  • Melanie Moreland
  • Mundt Family Foundation
  • Navigant Consulting Inc.
  • Ewa K. Norton and David Y. Norton Charitable Trust
  • Rasmuson Foundation
  • Brenda Rothert
  • Jonathan Sherman
  • Joseph Shunnarah
  • Steven Siple
  • Phil and Peg Soucy
  • Soucy Brian and Sherry Soucy Family Fund
  • Michael Spellman
  • Megan Lynn Swan Memorial Fund
  • Chris and Dennis Tackett
  • Talley Donor Advised Fund
  • Tesoro Foundation
  • The Toskan Casale Foundation
  • University of Minnesota
  • Valaree Wahler
  • Michael Whaley
  • Cindi and Alan Weeks

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • A to Z Impact Foundation
  • Deborah Abel
  • Robert and Lucille Accetta
  • Ronald Adler
  • Adventist HealthCare
  • Aetna Foundation
  • Albert Einstein Medical Center
  • Amanda Albright
  • All American Waste, LLC
  • The Allstate Foundation
  • Alpha Kappa Psi – MU PI Chapter
  • AmazonSmile Foundation
  • American Express Company Employee Giving
  • Jeanie Anderson
  • Christopher Andreas
  • Antonyan Miranda, LLP
  • AstraZeneca LP
  • Bob Atchinson
  • The Atkerson Family Fund
  • Michael Ausley
  • Christopher Avallone
  • Avalonbay Communities, Inc.
  • David Baer
  • Michael Baldwin
  • The Baldwin Group, Inc.
  • Balcony Club Checking
  • Daniel Ball
  • Barclays Bank
  • Mary Barnett
  • Andrea Baron
  • Diana Barron
  • Paul Barton
  • Bay Ridge United Methodist Church
  • Beauty 21
  • Cody Beers
  • Richard & Maxine Beisheim
  • Bell State Bank
  • Sawyer Bennett
  • Gail Bentley
  • Louisa Benton
  • The Berning Family Foundation
  • Carly Bibber
  • Wendell Birkhofer
  • Sharon Blair
  • Bliss Ink LLC
  • Bloomberg L.P.
  • Bloomfield Board of Education
  • Bonide Foundation, Inc.
  • John Bonsal
  • Boston Industrial Consulting, Inc.
  • Steven Botnick
  • Lisa Bottle
  • Jennifer Bouche
  • Bousquet Holstein, PLLC
  • Thomas Brancato
  • The Gusti Brandt Foundation Inc.
  • Janice Brandt
  • Mary Branstrom
  • Christine Brauer
  • Bright Funds Foundation
  • Lisa Brown
  • Adam Brown
  • Felicia Browning
  • Gail Budin
  • Christi Bulot
  • Deanne Burch
  • Pamela Brewer Burns
  • Busey Bank Associate Community Promise Fund
  • James Butler
  • C. Louis and Mary C. Cabe Foundation
  • Dan Cahill
  • Marjorie Cahn
  • Elias Can
  • Geralyn Cannon
  • Valerie Cantu
  • Tracy Carole
  • David Carp
  • Daniel Carter
  • Meg Cassidy
  • The Cayuga Nation
  • Dana Cazzulino
  • CDW Computer Centers Inc.
  • Center Lounge
  • Gloria and Moe Cevallos
  • Fon-Sheng Chang
  • Christina and Jason Chapin
  • Phillip Chappell
  • Charitable Adult Rides & Services, Inc.
  • Berenice Chauvet
  • Child and Family Psych Srvs, Inc.
  • Chipotle Mexican Grill
  • Roxanne Christakes
  • Christian Church of Arlington Heights
  • Toni Clark
  • Julie Clemente
  • The Clyde Cousins
  • Cognizant US Corp.
  • Donna Allen Wardenaa Russell Colgate Fund
  • Colley Family Charitable Foundation
  • Community Financial Credit Union
  • Community Foundation of Utah
  • Con Edison
  • Beverly Constantinou
  • William Coryell
  • CPP, Inc.
  • Tom Crawford
  • Crestwood Advisors
  • Adam Crisafulli
  • David & Shelli Crocker
  • Raymond Crosby
  • Crossroads Community Church, Inc.
  • Susan Crown
  • The Crystal Family Foundation
  • CT USSSA Softball
  • Charles Curran
  • Trey Cushman
  • Ryan Daming
  • Melanie Daniels
  • Dart Group II Foundation
  • Linda Dauphin
  • Steven Davidovitz
  • DaVita
  • Charles Debenedittis
  • Killoy Decision Resources Group (DRG)
  • Christopher DeLong
  • DelRisk, Inc.
  • Lori Deschene
  • Jennifer Dhanraj
  • Sean Dillon
  • Lief Doerring
  • Shannon Dooling
  • John and Maria Doukas Foundation
  • David Dowsett
  • Karen Drogin
  • Drummond Law, PLLC
  • John Dusek
  • Keri Dwyer
  • David Earthman
  • Eaton Corporation
  • Edelman
  • Einstein Montgomery Medical Center Medial Staff
  • Element Financial Corporation
  • Eli Lilly and Company Foundation, Inc.
  • Elton Family Foundation
  • Jonathan Ely
  • Alix Englebert
  • Epp-Mar Metal Company
  • Christopher Epperson
  • Eric Keirstad Memorial Fund
  • Bolero Ernst
  • Amos Eshel
  • Scott Eshleman
  • The Ethical Cultural Society of Bergen County
  • Janet and Dwight Evans
  • Everyone at Teklinx, Inc.
  • Expedia, Inc.
  • Fairport United Methodist Church
  • Sara Beiro Farabow
  • Jennifer and John Farrow
  • FCL Builders, LLC
  • Lisa Fields
  • Kevin Filter
  • Financial Planning Services
  • Samuel Finkel Charitable Foundation
  • Stan, Elissa, Jayna, and Hugh Fink Family Charitable Fund
  • Katie Finucan
  • First Home Care
  • First Service Residential New York, Inc.
  • Jennifer Fitchen
  • Fitness with Jaime, LLC
  • Veronica Franchino
  • Laurene Frederick
  • Joan Friedson
  • Lucille Friedson
  • Angie Fu
  • Avery Fuchs
  • Jack Fusco
  • Daniel Fuss
  • The Gales Family of Toronto
  • Gannon Family Foundation
  • The Gant Family Foundation
  • Jeannie Gaver
  • Don Gayhardt
  • Robert Gebbia
  • Genpact
  • Marcia Gerg
  • Steve Giuli
  • Brian Glennon
  • Rajeev Gohri
  • Andrew Gomer
  • Angelina Gomez
  • Jose Gonzalez
  • Google Matching Gifts Program
  • Goshen Hospital Association, Inc.
  • Edith Grady
  • John Greden
  • Paul Green
  • Jeremy Greenberg
  • Matthew Greiner
  • John Grieco
  • Brian Grieve
  • Peter Grostic
  • Jason Groth
  • Pat and Steve Grunebach
  • Kristin and Avery Guest
  • Melissa Gunther
  • Haffenreffer Family Fund
  • Michele Hamlin
  • Hammond
  • Harness, Dickey, and Pierce, PLC
  • Caroline Harrington
  • Sharon Harris
  • Douglas Harrison, Sr.
  • Ellen Harvey
  • Thomas Hassfurther
  • Patricia Hastie
  • Regina Hausmann
  • Tim Healy
  • Heed Foundation
  • Hemenway and Barnes, LLP
  • Helene Hendricks
  • Joseph E. & Frances E. Heney Charitable Trust
  • Don Hensel
  • Clare Herington
  • Highland Baking Company
  • Joe Hopfer
  • Tracy Houchins
  • William Houchins
  • Patricia Howard
  • Morris Hund
  • Mark Huttemann
  • IBEW Local 26
  • Indagare Travel, Inc.
  • Andrew Ingersoll
  • Inovateus Solar
  • J & J Trash Removal, Inc.
  • Michael Jaber
  • Kenneth Jaffe
  • Susan Janin
  • Steven Jarowski
  • Tonya Johnson
  • Zac Jure
  • Just Give
  • Bonnie Kalish
  • Shirley Kaminsky
  • Kaplan Family Foundation
  • Danny Kaufman
  • Kevin Kavanagh
  • john Keane
  • Raymond Keck
  • Elizabeth Keeley
  • Lauren Keeper
  • Robert & Margot Keith
  • John Kendall
  • Feliza and Jim Kepler
  • Helen Kim
  • Melissa King
  • Richard Kirchhoff
  • Brianna Klein
  • Jeremy Klein
  • Julia Knox-Hudson
  • Dan Kobler
  • Kohlberg Kravis Roberts and Co.
  • James Kopecky
  • Aidan Korte
  • James Kralik
  • Mo Krausman
  • Beti Kristof
  • David Kuker
  • Michael Kurian
  • Steven Kushnick
  • D. L.
  • Mary Lou Lambert
  • Noah Langholz Remembrance Fund
  • Kate Larrabee
  • Reuven Lazarus
  • Eugene Lederer
  • James Ledger
  • Kimberly Lent
  • Karen Levine
  • Karen Levine
  • Dr Jason Lezell
  • LifeNet Health
  • Jim Lighthizer
  • Adam Lipps
  • Living Water Worship
  • Living Works, NFP
  • Livingstone & Murray, Inc.
  • Lockheed Martin Employees’ Political Action Committee
  • Logistick, Inc.
  • Chris Lonardo
  • Chris Lowery
  • Laura Luc
  • Elaine Lucas
  • The Ludy Family Foundation
  • The Lyon-Sour Family Fund
  • Wendy Macdonald
  • Macon Elks Lodge
  • Marc Motors
  • Markel Corporation
  • Guillermo Marmol
  • Diane Mayer
  • The McCane Foundation Trust
  • Richard McClure
  • Elizabeth McCluskey
  • James B. McCusker
  • Vaughan McKee Family Trust
  • McKesson Foundation
  • Medpro Systems, LLC
  • Aanand Mehtani
  • Messiah Lutheran Church
  • Dylan Metcalf
  • Metro Insulation
  • Microsoft Giving Campaign
  • Shirley Miles
  • Robert Miller
  • Mary Jeanne Miller
  • Missouri Department of Mental Health
  • Maria Montanez
  • Eiji Morishita
  • Audra Morris
  • Nancy Morrison
  • Morton High School Seniors 2017
  • Multicultural Awareness Club at Penn State College of Med
  • Lynda and Richard Murphy
  • Meg Murray
  • David Muth
  • Rob Myers
  • N. Harris Computer Corp.
  • Nelco Foundation, Inc.
  • Charles B. Nemeroff
  • New York Life Giving Campaign
  • Nicole Edwards Limited
  • Elizabeth Noble
  • Novant Health, Inc.
  • Oak Terrace – National Philanthropic Trust
  • Mike Oakes
  • Anthony & Carol Offutt
  • Anamarie Olson
  • Open Dealer Exchange, LLC
  • Orrick, Herrington, Sutcliffe, LLP
  • David Ott
  • Paint Nite
  • Cynthia Pancer
  • Lucy Pang
  • Tiffany Parham
  • Bimal Parikh
  • Jeffrey Parks
  • Richard Payne
  • James Peck
  • Jamie Penner
  • Peoria Christian School
  • Ralph Peterson
  • David Peterson
  • Pfizer Foundation Matching Gifts Program
  • PHICAS Foundation TR
  • The Tania J. Phillips and Jeffrey S. Dover Charitable
  • PHR Holdings
  • Kristen Pierce
  • Chris Pietras
  • Pinelands Regional Junior High School
  • Leonard Pitt
  • Diana Pochos
  • Peter Powell Family Foundation
  • Powerhouse Pub
  • Provo Canyon Behavioral Hospital
  • Psi Upsilon, Hamilton College
  • Linea Pullia
  • Pulte Group
  • Purpose
  • R K LILLEY, LLC
  • Malva Rabinowitz
  • Ben Rabunski
  • Karen Ray
  • Susan Reed
  • William Reffert
  • Marcia Resnick
  • Revunami
  • Ellen Rick
  • Ricoh U.S.A., Inc.
  • Ridgewood High School
  • Scott Rivard
  • Donald and Carol Roberts Foundation
  • Brandon Rohlwing
  • Rachelle Roma
  • Pamela Romanow
  • Elliott Root
  • Jerrold Rosenbaum
  • Kelsey Ross
  • Rotary Club of Milford, CT, Inc.
  • Georgia Roth
  • Mike & Christy Rothkopf
  • Ruck-Up, Inc.
  • Brandon Russell
  • Michelle Saffert
  • Merchandise Sales
  • Matthew Salomon
  • Rebecca Sanchack
  • Sand Stew, Inc.
  • Rhonda Sanders
  • Marti Sauer
  • Daniel Schaufelberger
  • Matthew Schimming
  • Kevin & Suzanne Schon Foundation
  • Robert Schreiber
  • Martin Schultz
  • Andrea Scibetta
  • Second Annual Jake’s Ride
  • Elaine Sellenberg
  • Elie & Maureen Semaan & McMahon
  • Alex Sepiol
  • Paula Sherman
  • Service Credit Union
  • Sharp Mesa Vista
  • Shirts Plus, Inc.
  • Scott Siegel
  • Debora Sigler
  • Silhouette Pattern, Inc.
  • Jeanne Silvers
  • Diana Skogseth
  • Eric Slifka
  • Johanna Small
  • Dawn Smith
  • Derek Smyth
  • Daniel Sommers
  • Ellie Sorenson
  • Snow Companies, Inc.
  • Michael Spellman
  • Amy Spielman
  • Herbert Spies
  • Debi Spudich
  • Spynexgy, LLC
  • St. Edward Congregation
  • Suzanne Stack
  • Yvonne Stanek
  • Kathleen Stansky
  • State Employees’ Community Campaign
  • StiboSystems
  • Debbie Storey
  • Richard Sturgeon
  • Pristine Summer
  • Allison Sutherland
  • Greg Swango
  • Phillip Sweeney
  • Maria Swift
  • Susan Tavilla
  • Theta Chi Fraternity Alpha Iota
  • Mary & Gary Tietz
  • Heather Topoly
  • Tradebot Systems, Inc.
  • Andrew Trapp
  • David Tauber
  • The Pritzer Traubert Family Foundation
  • Trilion Capital
  • Turnkey
  • Dawn Tuttle
  • United Health Group
  • United Mine Workers of America
  • University of Maryland, Baltimore
  • Univision Management Company
  • UW Health Medical Foundation
  • Peggy Van Cleave
  • April Vara
  • Victoria Velie Henry
  • Crystal Veras
  • Leo Vergara
  • Katy Vickery
  • Caleb Walker
  • WalMart
  • Walnut Creek Rotary Club Community Foundation
  • Everett Walsh
  • Kira Warren
  • The Jan S. and David C. Weaver Fund of Central Carolina CF
  • Angela Webb
  • Webbmason Marketing
  • Myrna Weissman
  • Weissman Family Foundation
  • Danielle Wellbrock
  • Gary Wendlandt
  • Timothy Wenzler
  • Western Connecticut Health Network
  • Anna Westfall
  • Blake Whitaker
  • Mayra & Rob Wiessner
  • William T. Oxenham Foundation
  • Williams & Connolly, LLP
  • Danielle Williams
  • Jonathan Williams
  • Kelley Willitts
  • David B. Wilson
  • Marianne Wilson
  • Amy Wurtzburger
  • Nancy Wykoff
  • Yanbei Yao
  • Syma Zerkow

AFSP-Alabama

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Thomas R. & Deborah A. Davidson Foundation
  • Sigma Chi Fraternity
  • SouthWest Water Company

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Adele Pharo Azar Charitable Foundation
  • Beau Carter

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Carr Allison
  • Alabama Panhellenic Association
  • America’s First Federal Credit Union
  • Artisent Floors
  • Asbury United Methodist Church
  • BBVA Compass
  • Brundidge United Methodist Church
  • Cemex – Houston
  • Christina Chapin
  • Coastal Church
  • CRC Insurance Services, Inc.
  • Kiersten Crouse
  • Dearmon Timber Company
  • Carolyn Doss
  • John Farrow
  • Grayson And Associates
  • Heart Group of the Eastern Shore, P.C.
  • Melinda and Ron Helveston
  • London & Bill Hobin
  • Joe Piper Inc.
  • Kappa Alpha Theta – Tuscaloosa
  • Perry H. & LaVonda Keel
  • Kindred at Home
  • Lassiter Land Company, Inc.
  • Derek Massey Foundation
  • The Derek Massey Scholarship Fund
  • Michael Matkins
  • Andrew McLelland
  • Jim Meador-Woodruff
  • Clay Nolen
  • P & S Transportation, Inc.
  • PowerMotion
  • Ready Mix USA, LLC
  • Jonathan Robinson
  • Deak Rushton
  • Regions Bank
  • Sandifer & Associates
  • Shoe Fly
  • Southern Fireplaces
  • Jennifer and Mark Styslinger
  • Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A. – Florence
  • The Troy Hospital Health Care Authority/Troy Regional Medical Center
  • The University of Alabama at Birmingham Benevolent Fund
  • Viva Health, Inc.
  • Wiregrass Construction Company, Inc
  • WilliamUpton
  • Alan Weeks

AFSP-Alaska

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Acent Alaska
  • Bristol Bay Native Corp
  • CPH
  • The Dorsey and Whitney Foundation
  • Doyon, Limited
  • Fairbanks Central Labor Council
  • Foundation Health Partners LLC
  • Kenaitze Indian Tribe
  • Matson Navigation Co.
  • Mat-Su Health Foundation
  • Mandy Mueller
  • Providence Health Services – Anchorage
  • Sharon K Schaefer
  • United Way of Anchorage

AFSP-Arizona

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Argosy University
  • Tyler Dawson

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • AgeroThe Campbell Foundation INC
  • Carla Campo
  • Cenpatico Integrated Care
  • Dignity Health – AZ
  • Dawn Hunter
  • Bryan & Tara Massey
  • Caitlin McKenna
  • Melinda Vail, Inc.
  • Palo Verde Behavioral Health
  • Sue E. Waltman

AFSP-Arkansas

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Alpha Male
  • PricewaterhouseCoopers

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Arkansas Department of Health
  • Arkansas Families First
  • Arkansas Health Department
  • Arkansas Therapist Connection, LLC
  • Arvest Bank
  • Marcey Ball
  • Bradford Health Services
  • The Bridgeway
  • Anita Cabe
  • CHI St. Vincent Health System
  • Decision Point Center
  • Thomas Dickson
  • Families, Inc. Counseling Services
  • Audra Ferrell
  • Fay Glover
  • Irwin Agency
  • J.B. Hunt Transport Services, Inc.
  • Dana Kithell
  • Paulette Manville
  • Mary Meacham
  • Richard Miller
  • Pinnacle Point Hospital
  • Rivendell Behavioral Health
  • Beverly Rackley Rowlett
  • Ryder
  • John and Renee Stanton
  • Union Pacific Railroad
  • Windstream

AFSP-New York Capital Region

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • C. R. Bard Foundation
  • Brothers Classic Charity Golf Tour
  • Charles Crew
  • Kenneth Handler

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Chemcept
  • The Kerry Crew Charitable Gift Fund

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Acadia Insurance, a W.R. Berkley Company
  • Amaha Electrical Inc
  • Argyle Central School District
  • Liam Bancroft
  • Beacon Health Options
  • Captech Logistics
  • Citizen Advocates
  • Colby Senior Behavioral Health Unit/Adirondack Health
  • DHL Supply Chain
  • First Choice Financial
  • Fourth District Dental Society
  • GCAR Community Outreach Fund
  • Jamie Harris
  • Julie Hoy
  • Hudson River Bank & Trust, Co.
  • Carolyn L Nolan
  • Kenneth Romanski
  • James T. Russo Memorial
  • SABIC Innovative Plastics
  • Donald E Simmons CFP
  • BobStrode
  • Matthew Todriff
  • Paul Tonko
  • Ashley A Whittier

AFSP-Central Florida

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Robert Cardonne
  • Central Florida Behavioral Hospital
  • Patrick C. Crowell, P.A.
  • Ellen Rick

AFSP-Central New Jersey

Benefactors ($25,000-$49,999)

  • Global Giving Foundation Inc.

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Charles Morse

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Jane A.Bennett
  • Brianna Cannici
  • Canon Financial Services
  • Laura Cavallaro
  • Colts Neck High School
  • Coordinated Family Care
  • Evergreen Philanthropic Found.
  • Kelly Gensler
  • Joe & Diane Germmell
  • Greenwood Gaming and Entertainment, Inc
  • Investors Bank
  • Manasquan Bank
  • Manasquan Savings Bank
  • Mt. Carmel Reunion Group
  • Oliver Communications Group, Inc.
  • Parx Casino
  • Perkins
  • Philadelphia Insurance Companies
  • Raine Organization
  • Rob2199, LLC
  • Jennifer Schule
  • Roy Schwalbach
  • Lauren Siclare
  • Soltex, Inc.

AFSP-Central New York

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Karen & George Massarotti

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Here Comes the Sun Motorcycle Ride Fundraiser
  • Maser Consulting Foundation
  • Amanda Miller
  • Mohawk Valley Walk Raffle Proceeds
  • George Mowry

AFSP-Central Ohio

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • The Jeff Rader Memorial Fund

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Mark Colan
  • CompDrug
  • Jeanne Hardy
  • Jennifer RHuck
  • Simone Karp
  • Kettering Behavioral Medicine Center
  • Kohl’s Department Stores, Inc
  • Leclerc Charity Fund
  • Maria Stein Family Practice Inc
  • Nationwide Children’s Hospital – Columbus, OH
  • O.O.O. Enterprise Inc
  • Outreach Ability Services LLC
  • Providers for Healthy Living

AFSP-Central Philadelphia

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Gary & Patricia Glenny

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Chad Benner Helping Hands
  • Chipotle Mexican Grill
  • J.E. Wheelock Home Association
  • Skip Kozen
  • Theresa M. Michel
  • Sharon Miller
  • Mount Nittany Health
  • No More Dirty Blinds
  • The Meadows Psychiatric Center

AFSP-Central Texas

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Castle Hill Fitness
  • Floor and Decor
  • I Live Here, I Give Here
  • Reuben Martinez
  • Nicole Edwards Limited
  • PrintGlobe
  • Racing Systems
  • St. David’s Foundation

AFSP-Central Valley California

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Bank of the West
  • Patricia LBoardrow
  • David Cagle
  • Chuck Cheek
  • Betty Deck
  • Grand Foundation
  • Harold Crawford Co, Inc.
  • Carla Kinsley
  • Plumbers & Pipefitters-Local 442
  • Stuart David Home Furnishings
  • Stuart David Inc.

AFSP-Cincinnati

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Denny and Barb Greiwe
  • ISQCCBE
  • Pi Kappa Alpha-Eta Rho
  • Rhinestone Foundation Inc
  • The Western and Southern Life Insurance Company

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Community Foundation Holland/Zeeland Area
  • Gay & Lesbian Community Center
  • Emily Molina
  • William Posey
  • Ari Shifman

AFSP-Colorado

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Gabi Balhiser
  • Herda Family Fund

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Brookfield Residential
  • Jesse Campbell
  • Babette Canacari
  • Centennial Peaks Hospital
  • City of Gunnison
  • Credit Union of Colorado
  • Elliott Merrill Community Management
  • Brenda Fullerton
  • KyleHahnenberger
  • Highland Behavior Health System
  • Highlands Behavioral Health System
  • Living Works Education
  • Craig Merrill
  • Mesa Co Valley School District 51
  • Jeffrey O’Reilly
  • Jonathan Richardson
  • Rocky Mountain Crisis Partners
  • Roth Distributing
  • Donna Zielinski

AFSP-Delaware

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Lisa Bowen

AFSP-Eastern Missouri

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Thomas MGunn
  • Cameron Perkins Memorial Golf Tournament
  • Mark Perkins
  • Robert Family Holdings
  • Select Rehabilitation, Inc.
  • Tipton Linen

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • BBQ Fundraiser
  • Branson’s Nantucket
  • Audrey Burger
  • City of Florissant
  • Enterprise Holdings Foundation
  • Jaclyn Fearheiley
  • Jay Gee
  • Gershman Commercial Real Estate
  • Dan Kenkel
  • Theodore A. Kienstra Foundation
  • Jenna Koeller
  • Douglas Kost
  • Lindbergh High School
  • Mercy Hospital – St. Louis
  • Nemesis Fighting Alliance
  • Mike Otten
  • Pentair
  • Becky Riney
  • Anthony F Sansone Sr.
  • Michael Stars Foundation
  • Tod Stephens
  • Williams Construction Arkansas, Inc.
  • Stephen and Kathleen Zeller

AFSP-Florida First Coast

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Baptist Health
  • Black Knight Financial Services
  • Gerry Hurst
  • Landco Properties, Inc.
  • S & S Welding Inc
  • The Vines Hospital
  • Buffalo’s Reef Inc.
  • Galloway, Johnson, Tompkins, Burr, & Smith
  • Max and Deb Runciman
  • Wyndham Vacation Rentals

AFSP-Southeast Florida

Benefactors ($25,000-$49,999)

  • Sunrise Cares Inc

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • James Bernstein

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Grainger Foundation

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Estrella Insurance
  • Debra and Andrew Fechter
  • The Gardens Hotel
  • Larry and Lori Gordon
  • Joan and Don Gordon
  • Historic Tours of America
  • Joseph Jandrisch
  • The Kandell Fund
  • Lower Keys Medical Center
  • Michael MacDonald
  • Morgan Family Foundation
  • The Bobby Resciniti Healing Hearts Foundation
  • Andy & Debbie Ross
  • Debbie Schopp
  • Debra Shapiro-Ross
  • Stanley RSherman
  • Strochak Family Enterprises
  • TeamFootWorks
  • University of Miami
  • Carol & Howard Wulfson

AFSP-Southwest Florida

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Barbara Lasher
  • Ron, Judi and Luke Trebilcock

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Lionel and Shirley Trebilcock

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • FCCI Insurance Group
  • The Nau Family Charitable Fund
  • Setti Financial LLC

AFSP-Georgia

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Gilbane Building Company

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Behavioral Health Link
  • Casa Nuova Italian Restaurant

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Blain and Ivan Allen IV
  • Arbor Pharmaceuticals
  • Jeremy Argroves
  • Felicia Browning
  • Jeffrey A. Coe Charitable Fund
  • Costco Wholesale
  • Richard Curtis
  • Dirty South Burlesque and Cabaret
  • Roderick S., Flossie R., and Helen M. Galloway Foundation, Inc.
  • Priscilla Glass
  • Ariel Griffeth
  • Heritage High School
  • Integrated Health Resources, LLC
  • The Ivy Lane, Ltd.
  • Beatrix Knox
  • Jim McCaffrey
  • Maureen McCord
  • Jaye McMillan
  • Ron McNeely
  • Anthony Pourhassan
  • Steve Powers
  • The Rifkin Foundation
  • Kurt & Patricia Schmoke
  • Southeast High School
  • Synovus
  • Chris Travaille
  • The Will To Live Foundation, Inc.
  • United Way Of Coastal Empire
  • UPS Foundation
  • Wellstar Health Systems

AFSP-Greater Boston

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Boston DPH
  • Digital Federal Credit Union
  • Linda Marino
  • Massachusetts Department of Public Health
  • Laura Murnane
  • Newton South High School
  • Worcester Fire Road Race

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Ancient Craft Widows Sons
  • Ann W. Bresnahan
  • Butler Memorial Fund
  • DraftKings
  • Emerson Hospital
  • Loomis, Sayles & Company
  • Roger M. Marino
  • Remembering Jimmy
  • Subaru of New England, Inc.
  • Topsfield Athletic Association

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • AB Boys High School Hockey Team & Boosters
  • Alternative Home Health Care LLC
  • Argent Wealth Management
  • Beasley Media
  • Beverly Berman
  • Boathouse Group, Inc.
  • Bose Corporation Charitable Fund
  • MaryBrock
  • The Catered Affair
  • Central MA Suicide Prevention Coalition
  • Century Bank
  • Robin Claflin
  • Cosgrove, Eisenberg and Kiley PC
  • Coverys
  • David Crocker
  • D’Ambrosio Eye Care
  • Timothy and Catherine Davis
  • DMB and RAB, Jr. Scholarship Fund
  • Ricky Duran
  • The Eli Charitable Fund
  • Fallonhealth
  • Flynn Law Group
  • Idylwilde Farm, Inc.
  • Justice Resource Institute Inc
  • Dana Kelble
  • Brittany LaPointe
  • Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District
  • Tracie Lindsey
  • JohnLittle
  • WB Mason
  • McLean Hospital
  • Eric J. Drobinski Mem Foundation
  • Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky, & Popeo Attorneys at Law
  • NAMI of Central Middlesex
  • Jacqueline Narkiewicz
  • Susan Needle
  • Megan Neumayer
  • Danielle Newman
  • Ellen Noreen
  • North Easton Savings Bank
  • Kim O’Brien
  • Mary LO’Neil
  • Partners for a Better World
  • Perfect Body Laser
  • Keith Reardon
  • Lisa Ricciardelli
  • MelissaRogers
  • Judith Sarkovics
  • S. Nancy Smiches
  • David Soper
  • Michael Shawn Sousa Foundation
  • Snow Companies, Inc.
  • LisaStake
  • Merch Store
  • Sunteck TTS
  • TJX Company
  • Jeffrey Tovar
  • Matt Walker

AFSP-Greater Kansas

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Optumrx Inc

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • American Legion Riders Post 370
  • Cherish Caputo
  • The Children’s Mercy Hospital
  • Dora Coccetella
  • Ferroloy, Inc.
  • Memorial Golf Tournament for Suicide Prevention
  • Barbara E Nelson
  • Sonia Slaba
  • Michele Sordal
  • Sports Physical Therapists
  • State of Kansas
  • TCC Gives

AFSP-Greater Mid-Missouri

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Adam Carrico

AFSP-Greater Minnesota

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Michael and Luella Ballard

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Janelle Abbott
  • Avera Marshall
  • Michael Corrigan
  • Valerie Doherty
  • Rich Hirsch
  • Thomas Hurd
  • Lisa Bellucci Johanson
  • Aaron McNally
  • Chris & Mindy Moede
  • Andrew O’Brien
  • Performance Office Papers
  • Sigma Pi Fraternity – Iota Zeta Chapter – University of Minnesota
  • Samantha Simons
  • Jane Windmeier

AFSP-Greater Northeast Pennsylvania

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Angelika Everett

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Jackie Cusano
  • Pam Elliot
  • Junior Leadership Wilkes-Barre Class of 2016
  • Liberty Truck Center Inc., Harford Acct
  • JoAnne McCain
  • Barbara Mikielski
  • Mount Saint Joseph Academy

AFSP-Greater Philadelphia

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • DBHIDS
  • Dept of Behavioral Health & Intellectual Disability Services
  • Christian Evans
  • Kyle Ambrogi Foundation Inc.

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Johnson and Johnson
  • Lax4Life, Inc
  • Susan McCallion
  • PECO Energy Company
  • The Keith Thomas Perrymore Fund
  • SEI
  • Dominic Vinciguerra Memorial Foundation
  • Janice Vinciguerra

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Mark Braunstein
  • Caroline McGrath Brooker
  • Bruster’s Real Ice Cream, Audubon, PA
  • Katie Cassidy
  • CATCH, Inc.
  • Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
  • Eva M DiMichael
  • ERT Inc.
  • Friends Hospital
  • Kim Greenfield
  • Maria Grier
  • Diane Harrison
  • The Horsham Clinic
  • Stacy Kabic
  • Michele Kemble
  • Laurie Lang
  • MarketPlace Philadelphia L.P.
  • Karen Mastrocola
  • Carly McAneny
  • The McMichael Family Foundation
  • Shawn and Emily Meals
  • Milligan & Co., LLC
  • Mario Moya
  • Cindy Perlone
  • The Philadelphia Foundation
  • Philadelphia Police Department
  • Debra & Robert Potts
  • Powell Family Foundation
  • Richie Family Foundation
  • Scrub Daddy
  • Seven Hills Inc
  • Jim Stetler
  • Darby Sullivan
  • Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA Inc. & Lundbeck
  • Saint John Vianney Center
  • United Way of Greater Philadelphia & Southern New Jersey
  • Donna & Peter Witonsky
  • World Cafe Live – Philadelphia
  • Melissa Wozniak

AFSP-Greater Sacramento

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Kristina Alexander
  • Hilda Brown
  • Esurance Insurance Service, Inc.
  • Heritage Oaks Hospital
  • Apple Lohr
  • Pheasants Forever, Inc
  • Running Brave
  • Sierra Health Foundation
  • Sierra Vista Hospital
  • Summit Funding, Inc
  • Sutter Health

AFSP-Greater San Francisco Bay Area

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Kathryn Kimball

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • ATU 1555
  • Blackthorn Therapeutics Inc.
  • Drinker Biddle
  • Richard and Suzanne Kayne Charitable Fund

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Robert Bradley
  • The California Wellness Foundation
  • Circle of Service Foundation
  • Vernon Coleman
  • Contra Costa Medical Career College 1
  • Dharma Merchant Services
  • Diablo Gymnastics School
  • East Bay Claims Association
  • Julie Flynn
  • Fremont Hospital
  • Elizabeth Funk
  • Gideon Hausner Jewish Day School
  • Irene Green
  • HealthSPORT
  • Hensels Ace Hardware
  • Humboldt Patient Resource Center
  • Interior Motions
  • Gina Kausin
  • Elizabeth Larned
  • Suzanne Levit
  • Suzanne Levit
  • Montecito Market Place Associates
  • Mortar Foundation
  • The Oakland Raiders
  • Pacific Builders
  • Palayam Foundation
  • Palo Alto Med Foundation for Healthcare
  • James Purvis
  • Re/Max Humboldt Realty
  • Redwood Capital Bank
  • Gordon Rosenberg
  • R. L Ruefenacht
  • Santa Clara County Office of Education
  • Arnold Say Memorial Fund
  • Suzanne Skees
  • St. Joseph Health-Humboldt County
  • Bill Talios
  • Peter Thornton
  • TMS Health Solutions
  • Andrea Topper
  • Twirl For A Cause
  • United Healthcare
  • United HealthCare Services
  • Ronald C. Wornick Jewish Day School
  • Linda Yokoshima

AFSP-Hawaii

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Jadean DeCastro
  • Hawaii State Federal Credit UnionHiking With Keiki LLC
  • Moanalua HS JROTC Program
  • State of Hawaii
  • Jeanelle Sugimoto-Matsuda
  • United Church Of Christ – Judd Street

AFSP-Hudson Valley New York

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Patrick M. D’Aliso Foundation
  • Diane Missasi

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Bank of America
  • Heather Lee Camera Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Donna Chiapperino
  • KariConnors
  • Crystal Run Healthcare LLP
  • Crystal Run Transformation Services
  • Gwen Hibbs
  • New York State Bridge Authority
  • Chris Olson
  • Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  • Chris Rosin
  • Salina Sabri

AFSP-Idaho

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Lisa Dean
  • Kissler Family Foundation
  • Optum – ID
  • Optum – Meridian
  • Outpost Church
  • Portneuf Medical Center
  • Roadhouse Saloon

AFSP-Illinois

Benefactors ($25,000-$49,999)

  • John Burns Construction Company
  • John Muno

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Bruce C. Abrams Family Foundation
  • Blick Art Materials LLC
  • James M. Foote
  • Deidre Guy

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • 16 On Center
  • Gift of Hope Tissue Network
  • Alan Levinson
  • Cara Levinson
  • Regency Centers LLP

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Debbi Abramson
  • Advocate Lutheran General Hospital
  • The Allstate Foundation
  • Elliott Arditti
  • Erika Barber
  • BBMC Mortgage LLC
  • Scott Becker
  • Scott Becker
  • Joy Bilger
  • Fred Blitt
  • Connie Branson
  • Jan Brengel
  • Nan&Ron Brija
  • Chicago Area Chapter of Construction Financial Mgmt. Assoc.
  • Child Adolescent & Family Recovery Center
  • Samantha Clancy
  • Clarity Clinic
  • Carol Davis
  • Brian Dunterman
  • Edye Ellis
  • Robert Fink
  • Steve and Linda Goldsher
  • Guerrero Howe
  • Cindy Guy
  • Steve Guy
  • John Hanlon Jr.
  • H A S
  • Health Care Service Corporation
  • Carrie Hultgren
  • Iron Workers Local 392
  • Sean Jackson
  • Paulette Jurek
  • Warren Kammerer
  • Earl Kelly
  • Anne King
  • Richard Kirchhoff
  • Andy and Elaine Larsen
  • Jami Lavin
  • LaSalle Network
  • Lincoln Prairie Behavioral Health
  • Beth Lurz
  • Kevin Marcum
  • Andrew McPeters
  • Andrew McPeters
  • Caitlin Duffy Memorial Foundation
  • Meridian Group International, Inc
  • Miller Group Charitable Trust Fund
  • Millstone Weber LLC
  • Michael Minella
  • Michael Morales
  • Ellen Morley
  • Jennifer Murphy
  • Krisan Nash
  • Noble Kinsman Brewing Co.
  • Northern Trust Military Appreciation and Assistance Resource Council
  • Thomas P. and Patricia A. O’Donnell Foundation
  • OSF Healthcare
  • Payline Data
  • POS Remarketing Group Inc.
  • Burton Rosenberg
  • Salsa 17
  • Lissa Singer
  • Bennet and Lissa Singer
  • Spiritist Society of Chicago
  • Springfield Electric Supply Company
  • St. John’s Hospital
  • Streamwood Behavioral Health Center
  • Taylor Chrysler Dodge
  • Team LuLaRoe Sale Slingers
  • Tinker and Chance Development
  • UIC Depression Center
  • University of Illinois Center on Depression & Resilience
  • Jake Vinyard Foundation
  • Debbie Wagner
  • Amy Werkheiser
  • Alanna Winandy
  • Yellowbrick

AFSP-Indiana

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • American Veterans Motorcycle Riders Association
  • Ascension
  • Indiana Department of Mental Health and Addiction/Family and Social Services Adm
  • VFW Post 1587

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Cinco DeMopar
  • Community Health Network, Inc.
  • Family Social Services Admin (DMHA)
  • Main Source Bank
  • Rush Memorial Hospital

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • 3 Rivers Federal Credit Union
  • American Legion Post 331 Gaming
  • America’s Window, LLC
  • Bonnie Beaman
  • BK Club
  • Caesars Enterprise Services LLC
  • Thomas E. Carrico Garfield Post 88 American Legion Aux
  • Centerstone
  • Brenda Clapper
  • Community Hospital Anderson
  • Cummins Behavioral Health Systems Inc.
  • David Weekley Family Foundation
  • Deem LLC
  • Wayne and Michele DeVeydt
  • The Glick Fund
  • John Ferguson
  • First Baptist Church of Carrollton
  • Fraternal Order of Eagles Aerie 4167 – Eagles Rider Group
  • Fuel VM
  • Genesis Concepts
  • Kimberly Hatifield
  • Kameron Helmuth
  • Hoosier Park Racing & Casino
  • Indiana Grand Casino
  • IU Health North Hospital
  • Gabriel Jourden
  • Carole Kehl
  • Syed Khan
  • Local Union 1014 USW
  • Luarde Dental Care
  • Amber Lynch
  • Madison Family Dentistry
  • Bill MacLafferty
  • Matthew Ortega
  • Chris Overmyer
  • Porter-Starke Services, Inc.
  • School of Public Health – Indiana University Bloomington
  • Marge Weber

AFSP-Inland Empire and Desert Cities

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Tellabs Foundation

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • CDAR Realtors

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Argosy University Schaumburg Student Council
  • CJ’s Stir It Up Mongolian Grill
  • Jen Hoppe
  • Loma Linda University Health Services
  • Movement Makers
  • David JMuth
  • Curt Jure
  • Oasis/Valley Star Behavioral Health
  • Anthony Pisano
  • Williams JPitruzzeli
  • Bill Rich
  • Riverside County
  • Rucker Muth Luxury Homebuilders
  • Cary Schirmer

AFSP-Iowa

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Alive and Running

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Darla Brendemuehl
  • Citizens for Alex Kuhn
  • Curries Division Of AADG, Inc
  • The EZCORP Foundation
  • Mason City Clinic
  • Isabel McDanel
  • McKesson
  • Jeffrey K. Rowe
  • Gary Scrutchfield
  • Wink, Inc.

AFSP-Kentucky

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • ICAP Energy LLC
  • VIUS Services Corp

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Jonna Douglas
  • Eltoro.com
  • Ford Motor Company
  • Keith Fronabarger
  • GE Foundation
  • Terry Henderson
  • IUE/CWA Local 83761
  • Deborah Johnson
  • Jennifer FLe
  • Richard Rigney
  • Rivendell Behavioral Health Services
  • United Auto Workers Ford Local 862

AFSP-Lehigh Valley

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Nazneen Malik

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Lehigh Center For Clinical Research
  • Lehigh Valley Adventures for Cause
  • New Vitae, Inc
  • Kim Roadarmel

AFSP-Long Island New York

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Jeffrey and Robin Raich

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Kate Haas
  • L & M Healthcare Communications LLC
  • Lundbeck LLC
  • Morrison Foundation

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Advanced Energy Industries Inc.
  • Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty
  • The Ames Foundation
  • Joseph Camhi Foundation, Inc.
  • Debbie Caputo
  • Citnala Construction Corp.
  • Max B. Cohn Family Foundation
  • Daniel DeMarco and Associates, Inc
  • Dans Plan Inc
  • Earl L. Vandermeulen High School
  • Emerald Document Imaging
  • Roberta Fishbein
  • Geico
  • Gary Geverts
  • Diane Goldberg Foundation
  • Deborah Gunvaldsen
  • H2M Architects and Engineers
  • ThomasHalsch
  • In Memory of Alexandra Carroll
  • International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers
  • Jaspan Schlesinger LLP
  • JGN Construction Corp.
  • The Long Island Home – South Oaks Hospital Broadlawn Manor Nursing Care Center
  • Pat McCarthy
  • The Elena Melius Foundation
  • Mental Health Association of Nass
  • Metro Wide Format LLC
  • Frank Narciso
  • Ocean Spray Hot Tubs & Saunas
  • Park Place Restaurant & Bar
  • William M. Ross Timbil, LLC
  • Two Brothers Memorial Fund Inc.
  • United Way of Long Island
  • The Donald and Barbara Zucker Family Foundation

AFSP-Los Angeles

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • The David Young Choe Foundation

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Argosy University
  • Holiday Celebration Club
  • Kappa Kappa Gamma
  • LightHopeLife
  • Oxnard Monday Club

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • 310 Recovery
  • Allied Building Products
  • Amgen Foundation
  • Balance Treating Center
  • BBA Aviation USA Inc
  • Beauty and the Bar LLC
  • Frances Berumen
  • Center for Discovery
  • Charlottesville Pavilion Productions LLC
  • De Rubeis Fine Art
  • Dignity Health – French Hospital Medical Center
  • Fillmore – Charlotte
  • GoGuardian
  • Ana Govorcin
  • Hard Rock Cafe – Orlando
  • Loren Hill
  • Rebecca Hinojosa
  • John & Carolyn Hooten
  • House of Blues – Cleveland
  • Mission Produce
  • Karen Moraga
  • Jena Moraga
  • Kelly RO’Malley
  • Orange Peel Events LLC
  • The Panzer Foundation
  • Premier Concerts – Waterbury
  • Anthony Sansone Jr.
  • Signature Flight Support
  • VMWare Charitable Fund
  • We Are Concerts

AFSP-Louisiana

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Nat Kiefer

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • The Brett Thomas Doussan Foundation
  • Irish Channel Funding
  • Megan Kiefer
  • Team Justin

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Avoyelles Public Charter School
  • Denise P. Breaux Memorial
  • Bob Cason
  • Ray Cheramie
  • Christus Cabrini Hospital
  • Cruisin Cajun Country
  • Fraternal Order of Police & Bossier Police Local 645
  • Ryan E. Gatti Attorney Operating Account
  • Giles Automotive, Inc.
  • Kaylynn Gordon
  • J. Edgar Monroe Foundation
  • Mickey Landry
  • Brook Melancon
  • Radiant Life
  • Sam Houston High School PILOT Club
  • Rhonda Veazey
  • Willis-Knighton Health System

AFSP-Maine

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Confidential Appraisal Services LLC
  • Maine Marketing South DBA Aerus, LLC

AFSP-Maryland

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Ed’s Plant World Inc.

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Chalk Point
  • Bill Edmonds
  • Freddie Mac
  • Emily Fulkerson
  • Nelson Holt
  • NRG Energy Inc.
  • Sutton Properties LLC

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Adventist HealthCare Behavioral Health & Wellness Services
  • Valerie Gene Beacham
  • The Herb Block Foundation
  • The Bowers Group Inc.
  • Brennan Title Company
  • Charles Brinkman
  • Barbara Burdett
  • Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage
  • Robert H. and Monica M. Cole Foundation
  • Timothy Corcoran
  • Coverys
  • Lou & Sue D’Camera
  • Dave Denaci
  • Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation
  • Enterprise Holdings Foundation
  • Frederick Community College Center for Student Engagement
  • Gilly’s Craft Beer & Fine Wine
  • Glory Day’s Grill
  • Shelly Gold
  • Grace Nyblade- A New Leaf Therapy
  • Handbid
  • Jim, Nick, Bink, and Morgan, with Invictus International Consulting
  • Casimir Karasinski
  • Kelly Government Solutions
  • Koons of Annapolis
  • James Lighthizer
  • McCabe Insurance Associates, Inc. Representing Erie Insurance
  • Meritus Medical Center
  • Merkle Response Services, Inc.
  • James Murray
  • Cindy O’Brien
  • People’s Bank of York
  • Promotion Management Center, Inc.Carter Puryear
  • RD Bennett Concrete Construction INC
  • Karen Ryberg
  • Catherine Smith
  • Bob Sperling
  • Tagget Family
  • Mark Teeters
  • Transformations Fitness for Women
  • Tristar Martial Arts
  • VFW 7464
  • VFW Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #6027
  • Wegmans Food Markets
  • Western Maryland District, American Legion Auxiliary
  • Clive Williams
  • Vickie Winn
  • Margaret Wood
  • World Bank Community Connections Fund

AFSP-Memphis Mid-South

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • CFH Financial Services Inc.
  • Cecilia Degloma
  • FedEx

AFSP-Middle Tennessee

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Pilot Flying J
  • Anita McMahan Shubert

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • ADT Security Services
  • Best Buy – Murfreesboro
  • Robert Bryar
  • April Burr
  • The Charley Foundation
  • Gary Force Acura
  • W.R. Grace Foundation
  • Michael Hosale
  • Janet and Paul Kirschbaum
  • Joni Marshall
  • Red Line Bar & Grill
  • Saving Grace Fundraiser
  • DouglasTice
  • UL EHS Sustainability
  • Georgia Warrick
  • Wells Fargo (TN)

AFSP-Mississippi

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Theresa Danko
  • Mississippi Power Community Connection
  • Jennifer Trihoulis
  • Urgent Team Tupelo Center

AFSP-Montana

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Shannon Martell

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Anderson ZurMuehlen & Co.
  • Billings Clinic
  • AnneBradley
  • CHS Inc.
  • CHS Refinery, Pipelines and Terminals
  • RobertCrochelt
  • Jeanne Dussault
  • Enterprise Holdings Foundation
  • First Interstate Bank
  • First Presbyterian Church
  • Wilson Jackson
  • Pattie Kingston
  • Montana Psychiatry, PLLC
  • Neil Johnson Enterprises
  • NorthWestern Energy
  • Painting with a Twist – MT
  • Phillips 66 – Montana
  • Brandy Powers and Pattie Kingston
  • Providence Health and Services Western Montana
  • TinaRoark
  • SCL Health
  • St. Vincent Healthcare
  • Town Pump Charitable Foundation
  • Vietnam Veterans of America Inc
  • Vincent Von der Ahe

AFSP-National Capital Area

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Handbid
  • Prince William County Police Assoc.

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Cigna Health and Life Insurance Company
  • Malti Livingston
  • Bernard and Anne Spitzer Charitable Trust
  • Transurban

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • 9:30 Club
  • Carolyn Baker
  • Michelle Ball
  • Battlefield Baptist Church
  • Benzel-Busch Motor Car Corp.
  • Booz Allen Hamilton
  • Brothers of Sigma Phi Epsilon
  • BuckleySandler LLP
  • Lorraine Campbell
  • Chesapeake Surgical Ltd.
  • Clyde’s of Georgetown, INC T/A Clyde’s of Georgetown
  • Clydes Restaurant Group
  • Michael Cocroft
  • COLSA Corporation
  • DC Mosquito Squad
  • Feal Good Foundation
  • Thomas Fertitta
  • Fred Gantzler, III
  • Home Savings & Trust Mortgage
  • Anthony Iacovone
  • INova
  • Integrity Technology Service, Inc
  • Liv Live Concerts
  • Park View High School
  • Philip Howarth
  • Psychiatric Institute of Washington
  • Roberts Oxygen Company, Inc.
  • Shirley Contracting Company, LLC – VA
  • Sigma Phi Epsilon
  • The Ross Center for Anxiety & Related Disorders
  • Troutman Sanders LLP
  • William B. Hopke Company, INC.
  • Kelley Willitts
  • John Wood
  • Margaret Wood
  • Yanbei Yao
  • Bonnie Young
  • Edward Zimmerman

AFSP-Nebraska

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Susan and Jim Stuart Charitable Trust
  • TDAmeritrade

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Beverly Atkins
  • Boundless Operations, LLC
  • Joan Bruland
  • Julie M Caples-Wright
  • Jim Carveth
  • Community Alliance – Mental Health Recovery
  • Coverys
  • Goldbergs Bar and Grill
  • HelpSystems
  • Barbara Holmes (Binau)
  • Joseph Jackson
  • Barbara Jean
  • Deb Brixius, Tracy Moore, & Kam Neeman
  • PayPal
  • Region 6 Behavioral Healthcare
  • Terri Piccolo
  • Amy Reed
  • Seline Family Foundation
  • Sid Dillon Chevrolet Blair, INC
  • David Swearingen
  • Zfaty Burns

AFSP-Nevada

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • City of Las Vegas
  • MassMutual Boulder Basin

AFSP-New Hampshire

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Kappa Delta Phi

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Eastern Propane and Oil
  • Exeter Hospital
  • W. Kyle Gore
  • Brenda Labrie
  • Margaritas Management Group
  • Melissa O’Brien
  • Paulson Family Foundation
  • Michele Ramono
  • Raymond Romano Inc.
  • Kerry Scala

AFSP-New Mexico

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Coop Consulting
  • Desert Hills
  • End Suicide Albuquerque
  • Hinkle Law Offices
  • Roadrunner Business Networking Inc.
  • Lisa Ulibarri

AFSP-New York City

Benefactors ($25,000-$49,999)

  • Fordham Preparatory School

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Alliance Data
  • Michael Ashkenazy
  • Steven Ball
  • Steven Baron
  • Helen Chang
  • Chaparral Foundation
  • John Clancy
  • Kim Diamond
  • Pamela Farr
  • Mike Fischer
  • Fortress Investment Group
  • Brian Grieve
  • Gabrielle Kuzniecky
  • Raymond Lee
  • Anthony Mancuso
  • J John Mann
  • Morris Levine Key Food Stores Foundation, Inc.
  • Satwant Narula
  • Susan Numeroff in Memory of John David Buglisi
  • New York Psychotherapy &Counseling Center – NYPCC
  • M. Patricof
  • James Rodger
  • George and Carene Sangiuliano
  • SI South Shore Grandmother’s Club
  • SM 10000 Property LLC
  • Sylvia Smalls
  • Adam Spies
  • Shimmy and Racheli Spira
  • Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA Inc and Lundbeck
  • Lee and Cynthia Vance Foundation
  • Jacques YaDeau

AFSP-North Carolina

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Bob Barker Company
  • Coastal Carolina Neuropsychiatric Center
  • Courtney Carter Homes LLC
  • Family Preservation Services of NC
  • Foodbuy
  • Kelly McArdle Construction
  • Karen Lezzer
  • Novant Health
  • Old Vineyard Behavioral Health
  • Onslow Memorial Hospital
  • Paws & Claws Animal Hospital
  • Premier Research
  • Quality Agents LLC
  • Sandhills Behavioral Center
  • Teresa Batts Real Estate LLC
  • Town of Fuquay-Varina
  • Tim Wilson

AFSP-North Dakota

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Gate City Bank
  • Cindy Heidrich

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Affinity Plus Federal Credit Union
  • Kursten Cooper
  • Judy DuBois

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Bell Bank
  • Black Ridge Bank
  • Julie Blehm
  • Ron Burd
  • Cottingham Insurance Agency
  • Cyclegiving
  • Dawson Insurance
  • DMF Match
  • Doosan/Bobcat Company
  • Kathy Feist
  • Kevin Fisher
  • Brian Gale
  • Gate City Bank
  • Karin Haskell
  • Heartview Foundation
  • Holland Enterprises Inc
  • L2 Contracting
  • PCL
  • Taylor Peterson
  • Prairie St. John’s
  • Proximal 50, Inc.
  • Quality Title
  • Sanford Health
  • Lance Schreiner
  • Miranda Sherven
  • Solid Brotherhood Mc RRV
  • Zuger Kirmis and Smith

AFSP-North Texas

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Phi Delta Theta – Dallas

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Allergan USA, Inc.
  • Bradley Davis
  • Fluor Corporation
  • PPC Industries

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Michael Armondo
  • Scott Barretto
  • Adam S. Butera, M.D., P.a.
  • Chartwell Investments
  • Communities Foundation of Texas
  • Enterprise Holdings – Dallas
  • Roy Gene and Pamela Evans Foundation
  • Rob Fest
  • Sarah Foley
  • Charles Gummer
  • David Harrell
  • Hersh Foundation
  • Rick Looby
  • Janet Metcalf
  • Taunya Moore
  • NexGen Fitness
  • Gail and Harris Nobles
  • Quick Sumo Pest Control
  • Rainy Day Services
  • The Robert M. Rogers Foundation
  • Texas Tech Federal Credit Union
  • Texoma Health Foundation
  • Tyler Complete Care
  • Yuan Wang

AFSP-Northern Connecticut

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Debra Cooper
  • Arthur Simonian

AFSP-Northern New Jersey

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Toni and Aman Vazir

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Arrow Fastener Co., Inc.
  • Harvey Bell
  • Capital One Bank
  • Robert Castrignano
  • Stephen Cohen
  • Janice Cooney
  • Gerry Flynn
  • Green Village Fire Dept
  • Phil Hennebry
  • Hickory Tree Landscaping
  • Jeff Ten-Kate
  • KPMG LLP
  • Rachel Lipschutz
  • Metal For Life
  • The Nutley High School Class of 2017
  • Pursue Physical Therapy & Performance Training
  • Realogy Corporation
  • John & Sharon Riley
  • Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Thorlabs, Inc
  • John Toskovich
  • Town of Secaucus
  • Alicia Vella
  • Alan P. Westra Memorial Fund
  • WPU Greek Senate

AFSP-Northern Ohio

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Josh Auxier
  • Interstate Gas & Supply
  • Redhawk Grille

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Jesse Baden
  • Katy Baden
  • Paul and Dina Block Foundation
  • Blue Jay Communications
  • Buckeye Freedom Jeep Club
  • Classic Tattoo
  • Ann Cohen
  • Cole Crawford
  • Dino Palmieri Salon & Spa – Summit
  • Kent Quality Foods Inc
  • Christine Lee
  • Leipsic United Methodist Church
  • Lorain County Board of Mental Health
  • Eddie Miller Memorial Foundation
  • Northwest Bank
  • Ohioans Home Healthcare
  • Tracy & Bruce Oschman
  • RFS Charitable Foundation
  • Team Sweet Melissa
  • Gary and Marie Whitehurst
  • Zepf Center

AFSP-Oklahoma

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Chisholm Public Schools Activity Fund
  • Muscogee Creek Nation, Department of Health
  • The Morrison Group
  • Trinity Brick Sales INC

AFSP-Orange County

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Jacquelyn Bogue Foundation
  • Toyota of Huntington Beach

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Alliance West Mortgage
  • Argosy University, Los Angeles and Sarasota Campus
  • Helen I. Briggs
  • Michael Jaber
  • Mary E. Moore Family Foundation
  • Barry Peele
  • Linda Scholle
  • D. James Taylor

AFSP-Oregon

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Collins Foundation
  • Daimler Trucks North America (DTNA)

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Olive Bridge Fund
  • FedEx Ground
  • Gretchen Krug

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Geoffrey Bruce
  • Chelsea Brundige
  • Care Oregon
  • Color Tile & Carpet of Salem
  • Anna Maria Dulaney
  • FamilyCare Health
  • Kelly Fisher
  • Fred Meyer
  • G5
  • GOBHI
  • Kristin and Pete Guest
  • Randi Hedin
  • Jackson Auto Body
  • Parker Bounds Johnson Foundation
  • Kipco Construction LLC
  • Northwest Human Services – Crisis & Information Hotline
  • Oregon Fuel Injection,Inc
  • Pacific Stair Corporation
  • Bruce Retchless
  • Salem Health
  • State of Oregon Department of Corrections
  • T-Mobile
  • T-Mobile – Salem
  • Ted Rudiger Excavation
  • Lisa Trupka
  • Weber Accounting & Tax Service

AFSP-Rhode Island

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Scituate Lions Club

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Cyber Security Research and Solutions company match #2
  • Electric Boat Quonset Point Facility
  • T . Martra

AFSP-San Diego

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Argosy University

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Snap-Raise

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Care 1st Health Plan
  • Jim Hofmockel
  • Aggi Hollifield
  • Cassandra Jacob
  • Matt Jones
  • Littler Mendelson Foundation
  • McKewon Family Fund c/o The San Diego Foundation
  • Mossy Toyota
  • Perry Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram
  • Rancho Valhalla Nursery
  • Jeffrey Schoenfeld
  • Claire Sugishita
  • Carol Troy
  • Keith Wagner

AFSP-Southeast Minnesota

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Celanese Foundation

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Assurant Foundation
  • Capital Safety
  • RyAnne Holden
  • Scott Krause
  • Nancy McMahon
  • Pam and Dave Nelsen
  • Nauti Hawg Bar & Grill Golf Tournament Fundraiser for AFSP
  • Red Wing Credit Union
  • Rochester Community Schools

AFSP-South Carolina

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • State Of South Carolina

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Annual Mitchell Hunt Golf Tournament

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Blue Cross Blue Shield of South Carolina
  • Bon Secours St. Francis Health System
  • Ronald Dalessandro
  • Dennis Gillan
  • Brian Hunt
  • Illinois Tool Works Foundation
  • Daniel Island Community Foundation
  • The Jonathan Foundation
  • Ernest King
  • Lakewood High School
  • New England Appliance
  • Lisa Pappas
  • RNA Investments, LLC
  • Roper St. Francis Healthcare
  • Three Rivers Behavioral Health

AFSP-South Central Pennsylvania

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Corey L. Glenny Memorial Golf Tournament

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • ACCO Brands USA
  • American Stock Transfer
  • Arch Insurance Group
  • The Foundation for Enhancing Communities
  • Hershey Entertainment & Resorts Company
  • Hershey Trust Company
  • Levine Enterprises, Inc.
  • LifeCare Hospitals of Mechanicsburg
  • LifeCare Management Serivces, LLC
  • Todd E. Martin Memorial Golf Tournament
  • Charles J McKain
  • Northeastern Foundation
  • Teresa Perez

AFSP-South Dakota

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Sanford Hospital

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Reliabank Dakota
  • Val Wellnitz

AFSP-South Texas

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Craig W. Spaulding

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • South Texas Behavioral Health Center

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Allstate – Mission, TX
  • Argo Group
  • Dan Brown and Associates
  • Camp to Success
  • Cheniere Energy
  • Craig Franklin, CPA, PC
  • Lupita Garcia
  • Give Back Auctions
  • Goldsbury Foundation
  • H.E.B.
  • Melissa Hinojosa-Zamora
  • Amie Juarez
  • Stone Oak Psychiatry
  • Tropical Texas Behavioral Health

AFSP-Southeast Michigan

Founders ($50,000+)

  • Howell Public Schools

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Grennan Construction
  • Peter Miller
  • Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Acrisure LLC
  • Karren Annis and Mike Dazy Family Foundation
  • BASF Corporation
  • Michael Betz
  • Bodman PLC
  • Sharon Cheek
  • Clarity Voice
  • Clark Construction Company
  • Covenant Church
  • Detroit Pistons Public Relations
  • DH Construction Company
  • Noah Dorfman
  • Emergent BioSolutions
  • The Fillmore Detroit
  • Forest View Hospital
  • Chad Gilchrist
  • Julie Gonzales
  • Grand River Aseptic Manufacturing, Incorporated
  • Caldwell Hart
  • Haslett Middle School
  • Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
  • The Korff Foundation
  • Brandon Lancaster
  • Lansing Catholic Church
  • LBM Advantage
  • Lippert Components
  • Renee and Jason McKarge
  • McLaren Greater Lansing
  • Vicky C. Mennare
  • Michigan High School Athletic Association
  • Jerome Moceri
  • Melissa Parsons
  • Anne Perry
  • Stacy Powelson
  • Cindy Skrobot
  • Nissa Smith
  • Sparrow Health System
  • Stevensville High School
  • The Stonisch Foundation
  • Gregory Swango
  • Thriveworks Beverly Hills
  • Uaw Local 373
  • Valassis
  • John Van Dam
  • Todd Waite Legacy Foundation
  • Louise Wasso
  • WBHR Consultants Inc
  • Yazaki North America
  • Steve Yontz
  • Donna Zielinski

AFSP-Southeast Texas

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Silver Eagle Distributors

AFSP-Southern Connecticut

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Skate Movement Inc.

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Darcy Hicks

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Bearingstar Insurance Charitable Fund
  • Bloomberg L.P.
  • The Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Health
  • Dawn Goodwin
  • IDOC, LLC.
  • Lesley Jacobs
  • Michael, Conor, Rory & Eamon Jones
  • Koskoff, Koskoff, Bieder, P.C.
  • Carolina Mata
  • Tara Matteo
  • Melodee Roo & The Wantoks Too! Letters For Grieving Children Like You
  • Moreira Electric LLC
  • Pitney Bowes Employee Matching Gift Program
  • Silver Hill Hospital
  • Virgilio Tovar
  • Kevin Ziolkovski

AFSP-Tampa Bay

Benefactors ($25,000-$49,999)

  • 13 Ugly Men Foundation, INC.

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Foundation for Orthopaedic Research
  • Frankle Family Foundation Inc.

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Catalina Charitable Foundation

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Sandy Anthony
  • Catalina Marketing Charitable Foundation
  • FastSigns-Palm Harbor
  • Mahaffey Apartment Co.
  • Luke Maidhoff
  • Medical Center of Trinity
  • Jack Montero
  • Soil Tech Distributors
  • TECO
  • Sue Wegener
  • Willis Foundation

AFSP-Utah

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Invest in Others Charitable Foundation INC
  • Teva Pharmaceuticals

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Cyprus
  • Taylor Hagen Memorial, Inc.

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Apex Dental
  • Backman Title Services
  • Fred Bondesen
  • Break-Thru Kickboxing & Fitness
  • The Bringhurst Group
  • Destinations Inc
  • Dominion Energy
  • E-Corp
  • Fallen Brothers
  • Bart Hoerner
  • Infinity Psychological Services, PLLC
  • Intermountain Healthcare
  • Lisa Jungemann
  • KB Oil
  • KSL TV
  • LDS Hospital
  • Carolyn Mannix
  • The McCullough Group
  • Neurobehavioral Center for Growth
  • Questar
  • Red Rock Canyon School
  • Remedy Tattoo Parlor
  • Richfield Area Chamber
  • Salt Lake Behavioral Health
  • Sanofi Foundation for North America
  • Kim Slaymaker
  • Smith’s Food & Drug
  • State of Utah
  • The Utah Scholarship Foundation
  • Tonaquint Data Center
  • Utah Department of Health
  • Allen Weggemann

AFSP-Vermont

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Four Seasons Sotheby’s International Realty

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Amanda’s Cakes & Goodies
  • Kristy Barrows
  • Malcolm Dorris
  • Robert Kulason
  • Jackson Murray
  • SCDA, LLC

AFSP-Virginia

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • AXA Foundation
  • Robert Stanford

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Beach Pet Hospital
  • Joan Brewer
  • Centra Mental Health Services
  • Christian Psychotherapy Services
  • Colonial Behavioral Health
  • Community Foundation of Central Blue Ridge
  • Steven Cull
  • Danville Toyota Scion
  • Dawson Ford Garbee
  • Alison L Dickerson
  • Dynamic Aviation
  • E & J’s Deli Pub
  • Eavers Tire Pros
  • First Home Care
  • Shane Fletcher
  • Greenbrier Dodge Of Chesapeake
  • Rhianon Ham
  • Hermitage Hill Farm & Stables
  • The Hughes Center
  • Emma Inman
  • Inside Out Construction Inc.
  • Intuit Foundation
  • Tina King
  • Matthew Kirwan
  • LifeNet Health
  • Thomas Linton
  • Malloy Toyota
  • Garrett Maroon/The Maroon Group
  • Moseley Ventures
  • Navy Federal Credit Union
  • Newport News Sheriff’s Office
  • Pizzeria Bella Vista by Signorelli
  • PRA Group, Inc.
  • Catherine Raisor
  • Riverside Hospital Services
  • Silicon Valley Community Foundation
  • Angela Shawaryn
  • Skanska USA Civil Southeast Inc.
  • St. Michael Lutheran Church
  • Buddy Terrell
  • Toast – Chez Peewee LLC
  • Michael Turner
  • United Steel Workers Local 831
  • Valley Community Services Board
  • Vandeventer Black Foundation INC
  • The Well Church

AFSP-Washington

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • ACE Hardware
  • Anne Beatty
  • Braces Inc
  • Coverys
  • Melinda Dutton
  • Elton Family Foundation
  • Lisa Freiss
  • Imperial Sovereign Court of Tacoma
  • Microsoft
  • Matt Perkins
  • Providence Health & Services
  • Matt Solan
  • Spokane Kickball and Sports
  • Technical Systems Inc
  • Jason Walker
  • Western National Insurance

AFSP-West Virginia

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • CCMH Federal Credit Union
  • First Choice Services, Inc.
  • Krystle Gladu
  • Harper Farms LLC
  • Deborah R Hartshorn
  • Horizon Mental Health Management
  • Heather Jarvis
  • Lincoln Primary Care Center
  • Northwood Health Systems
  • Parkersburg Orthopedic Associates, Inc
  • Jean Teter

AFSP-Westchester

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Team Daniel Running for Recovery
  • John and Kelly Woods

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Allstate Foundation
  • Gary Davis
  • Michael Greenspan
  • Michael, Beth Ann and Sarah Hutcherson
  • Albert Pylinski and Frank Ferrante
  • The Ursuline School of New Rochelle
  • Maureen and Doug Wisner
  • The Yoga Source, Inc.

AFSP-Western Massachusetts

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Isaac Souede

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Austen Riggs Center
  • The Brien Center
  • Cobb of River Valley Inc
  • Health New England
  • Higgins Family Foundation
  • Anna Rhodes
  • Michele & Tom Sirois
  • University of Massachusetts
  • P.J. & G.M.G. Varley
  • Stephanie Zuidema

AFSP-Western New York

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • Judy L Samulski
  • SPUDS Campaign

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Laurie Austin
  • Monica Bard
  • BestSelf Behavioral Health
  • Michelle Cammarata
  • Central Lanes
  • Theresa Chase
  • Joe Federico
  • Nancy Gleason
  • GMR Associates, Inc.
  • Good Times of Olean LLC
  • Greater Chautauqua
  • Jan Hall
  • Ian’s Zombie Impact- For the Love
  • Jamestown Advanced Products
  • Kelly for Kids Foundation
  • Christina Klaffka
  • Knights of Columbus
  • Lake Shore Behavioral Health INC
  • Katie Leavitt
  • Joan Lloyd
  • Richard T Mulcahy
  • Brenda Nease
  • Paychex Community Foundation Inc.
  • Postler & Jaeckle Corp.
  • Rebuild Apparel
  • Jill S Rivard
  • Rochester Institute of Technology
  • John Rodgers
  • Angelo Tomasello TTEE
  • UB Student Wellness (UB Foundation Activities, Inc.)
  • United Way of Buffalo and Erie County
  • Christian Vanni

AFSP-Western Pennsylvania

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • The Magovern Family Foundation
  • Pi Kappa Alpha – Gamma Sigma

Sponsors ($5,000-$9,999)

  • AJ Smith Memorial Golf Fund
  • Pine-Richland Education Assoication
  • Takeda Pharmaceuticals USA Inc. & Lundbeck

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Allegheny Health Network
  • Nick Barson
  • Paul and Dina Block Foundation
  • Clay Cassidy
  • Community Alternatives, Inc
  • John and Cathy Demos
  • Nicky Dittmer
  • Geotechnical Testing Services, Inc.
  • Jutty’s Journey
  • Latrobe Federal Credit Union
  • Christi Laughlin
  • Chuckie Mahoney Memorial Foundation
  • Anthony Meledandri Memorial Fund
  • Mustin Chiropractic Clinic, PC
  • Pittsburgh Ketamine
  • Rakowich Family Foundation
  • Kelly Robinson
  • WesBanco Bank
  • Western Beaver County School District

AFSP-Wisconsin

Patrons ($10,000-$24,999)

  • Epic

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • Aspirus, Inc.
  • Belles Castle Inn
  • Brokaw Credit Union
  • Megan Capra
  • Church Mutual Employees Association
  • Enbridge
  • The Grainger Foundation
  • Anastasia Huber
  • Linda Keller
  • Marshfield Clinic
  • Mercy Health System
  • Tim Metcalfe
  • Rose Molz
  • Radiology Associates of Wausau, S.C.
  • Mary Beth Rylcap
  • Brandon Shack-Harris
  • Mandeep Singh
  • St. John the Evangelist – KSKJ 65
  • UW Health & Unity Health Insurance
  • Maxwell Van Haveren
  • Walworth County Health and Human Services

AFSP-Wyoming

Associates ($1,000-$4,999)

  • The Iron Brotherhood Sheridan
  • Sheridan Memorial Hospital

2017 Overnight North Stars

San Diego & Washington, D.C.

  • Raymond Burke

San Diego

  • Bradley Crowe
  • Ann Marie Farino
  • Scott McElhinney
  • Marcia Resnick
  • Brian Siegel
  • Patricia Todd

Washington, D.C.

  • Lee Alcott
  • Michael Ballard
  • Nancy Cook
  • Samantha Fahy
  • Susan Flint
  • RoseMary Fuss
  • Susan Gibbons
  • Bill Groener
  • Mo Krausman
  • Marty Ryan
  • Kendall Ryan
  • Dennis Tackett

2017 Community & Campus Walk North Stars

Alabama Walk

  • Alan Weeks

Annapolis Walk

  • Ajia Holt

Atlanta Walk (2016)

  • Michael Brown

Berkshire County Walk

  • Molly Souede

Bismarck/Mandan Walk

  • Cindy Heidrich

Boston Area Walk

  • Linda Marino

Buffalo Walk

  • SPUDS Campaign

Burlington County Walk

  • Jeanne Andersen

Burlington VT Community Walk

  • Ashley McAvey

Capital Region Walk for R.I.T.A.

  • Dan Egan

Champaign/Urbana Walk

  • Angie Davenport

Chicagoland Out of the Darkness Walk

  • Jon Brija
  • Cara Levinson
  • Amy Kartheiser
  • Richard Kirchhoff

Cincinnati Walk

  • Missy Cates

Denver Metro Walk

  • Gabi Balhiser

Fairfax NOVA Walk

  • David Kerrigan

Greater Fredericksburg Walk

  • Angela Shawaryn

Jersey Shore Walk

  • Dennis Vassallo

Mohawk Valley Walk

  • Karen Massarotti

Salt Lake City Walk

  • Mary Lou Arveseth

Santa Rosa Walk

  • Brenda Talios

St. Louis Walk

  • Carol Kost Cantor

St. Petersburg Walk

  • Sandy Anthony

Troy Walk

  • Jake Doggett

Tuscaloosa Walk

  • Emma Farrow

Yellowstone Valley Walk

  • Joan Nye
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About AFSP Research Grants

In 2017, AFSP invested a total of $4.65 Million Dollars in 27 new research grants. AFSP is the largest private funder of suicide research. Our Scientific Council helps set the national research agenda.

Of those grants, two are Focus Grants, totaling nearly $2 million.

Over the past 5 years, AFSP has awarded $18.8 million.

Over the past 10 years, AFSP has awarded $26.5 million.

AFSP’s research grants cover a broad range of categories including:

NEUROBIOLOGICAL: How do brain structure and neurochemical function contribute to suicide?

PSYCHOSOCIAL: What are the risk factors and warning signs for suicide?

GENETIC: What genetic pathways are associated with suicide risk, and can we develop biological interventions and treatments?

TREATMENT: What treatments — like therapies and medications — are effective at reducing suicide?

COMMUNITY: What universal prevention programs — like hotlines, gatekeeper training, and community-based programs — are the most effective?

LOSS SURVIVORS: What is the impact of suicide loss, and what helps the healing process?

Volunteer Spotlight

Research Study: Behavioral Mechanisms, Prediction, and Treatment of Short-Term Suicide Risk

Over the past 40 years, research has shown that lithium can help to reduce suicide risk… but we don’t yet know how. The following study seeks to determine if cognitive and behavioral factors associated with suicide, such as decision making, aggression and impulsiveness, change with lithium treatment.

Dr. Alan Swann of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas has always been interested in finding practical approaches to treat severe clinical problems. During his residency, he studied mood disorders and the mechanisms that activate human behavior. During this time, he developed a particular interest in the interaction between two seemingly opposite states: mania and depression.

The combination of these two states, which can fluctuate rapidly, is associated with an increased risk for suicide. Parallel to developing this interest, Dr. Swann had the opportunity to research lithium in relation to mood disorders, studying its effects on brain function and aggressive behavior. Soon afterward, he collaborated in a clinical study of people who had survived self-inflicted gunshot wounds. This led him to the finding that impulsive behavior was related to feelings of hopelessness.

Impulsivity, Swann discovered, increased the likelihood that someone would go through with a planned suicide attempt. Certain measures of impulsivity were elevated in people with bipolar disorder who had made potentially lethal suicide attempts. This was true whether the attempts were classified as “impulsive” or “premeditated.” Interestingly, participants in the study of self-inflicted gunshot wounds reported that the immediate precipitant of their suicide attempt was often a relatively minor stressor. Severe suicidal behavior appeared to be a combination of long-term factors and immediate regulation of behavior associated with stressors.

While it is widely held that lithium can reduce suicide mortality through its effects on aggression and/or impulsivity, such effects have never been demonstrated using quantitative behavioral or physiological measures. As the recipient of one of this year’s two coveted AFSP Focus Grants – targeted, innovative, and potentially high impact studies that seek to inform and even transform suicide prevention efforts – Dr. Swann will be further studying the underlying mechanisms that change with f lithium treatment that makes it effective for short-term suicide risk.

About AFSP Research Grants

In 2017, AFSP invested a total of $4.65 Million Dollars in 27 new research grants. AFSP is the largest private funder of suicide research. Our Scientific Council helps set the national research agenda.

Of those grants, two are Focus Grants, totaling nearly $2 million.

Over the past 5 years, AFSP has awarded $18.8 million.

Over the past 10 years, AFSP has awarded $26.5 million.

AFSP’s research grants cover a broad range of categories including:

NEUROBIOLOGICAL: How do brain structure and neurochemical function contribute to suicide?

PSYCHOSOCIAL: What are the risk factors and warning signs for suicide?

GENETIC: What genetic pathways are associated with suicide risk, and can we develop biological interventions and treatments?

TREATMENT: What treatments — like therapies and medications — are effective at reducing suicide?

COMMUNITY: What universal prevention programs — like hotlines, gatekeeper training, and community-based programs — are the most effective?

LOSS SURVIVORS: What is the impact of suicide loss, and what helps the healing process?

Volunteer Spotlight

Research Study: Using Nitrous Oxide to Treat Suicidal Ideation in Depressed Hospitalized Patients

Imagine if there were treatment that could be used in emergency departments and inpatient units that rapidly reduced suicide risk, had few side effects and was safe and available for most people with suicidal ideation and behavior.

Dr. Charles Conway has been working with his team at the Washington University School of Medicine to study treatment-resistant major depression – or TRMD – for many years. TRMD is the most severe form of depression, and the leading cause of suicide. An estimated 15 percent of those suffering with TRMD die by suicide.

Recently his team, in collaboration Dr. Peter Nagele from the Department of Anesthesia at Washington University, conducted a study using nitrous oxide – known colloquially as “laughing gas” – in a group of individuals with TRMD. Within that study, they were able to demonstrate that nitrous oxide was effective in lowering depressive symptoms. Among the symptoms, suicidal thinking underwent the greatest change.

From that study, the idea emerged to specifically target suicidal thinking using this treatment in hospitalized patients with acute suicidal ideation. Dr. Conway is the recipient of one of this year’s two coveted AFSP Focus Grants: targeted, innovative, and potentially high impact studies that seek to inform and even transform suicide prevention efforts.

The project has great significance to Dr. Conway’s team, several of whom are motivated through their firsthand experience of the extreme pain and suffering associated with the loss of a loved one by suicide. It is Dr. Conway’s hope that this study will provide evidence of nitrous oxide’s usefulness in reducing suicidal thinking…a finding that could potentially revolutionize the field of suicide prevention.

About AFSP Research Grants

In 2017, AFSP invested a total of $4.65 Million Dollars in 27 new research grants. AFSP is the largest private funder of suicide research. Our Scientific Council helps set the national research agenda.

Of those grants, two are Focus Grants, totaling nearly $2 million.

Over the past 5 years, AFSP has awarded $18.8 million.

Over the past 10 years, AFSP has awarded $26.5 million.

AFSP’s research grants cover a broad range of categories including:

NEUROBIOLOGICAL: How do brain structure and neurochemical function contribute to suicide?

PSYCHOSOCIAL: What are the risk factors and warning signs for suicide?

GENETIC: What genetic pathways are associated with suicide risk, and can we develop biological interventions and treatments?

TREATMENT: What treatments — like therapies and medications — are effective at reducing suicide?

COMMUNITY: What universal prevention programs — like hotlines, gatekeeper training, and community-based programs — are the most effective?

LOSS SURVIVORS: What is the impact of suicide loss, and what helps the healing process?

Volunteer Spotlight

Research Study: Safety Planning Intervention to Reduce Short-Term Risk (or, A Tale of Two Researchers)

Imagine if there were a simple, personalized plan that helped people deal with suicidal thoughts and behavior as they emerged…so they could save their lives, rather than take their lives.

Sometimes, the meeting of two great minds seems a matter of fate…though in this case, AFSP may have played a role in making it happen. Dr. Gregory K. Brown, Director of the Center for the Prevention of Suicide in the Department of Psychiatry at the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, first met Dr. Barbara Stanley, Director of the Suicide Intervention Center in the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University, in 2004 when AFSP sponsored a collaborative, multi-site research project on the detection and classification of suicidal behaviors in emergency departments. That study provided important data involved with the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale, which is now widely used for detecting suicidal ideation and behavior in both research and practice settings. They, along with Dr. Glenn Currier, from the University of Rochester (currently chair of psychiatry at University of South Florida), received the 2009 AFSP Research Award for their work assessing suicide risk in three emergency departments.

Now, Drs. Brown and Stanley are working together again, as the recipients of an AFSP Focus Grant on Safety Planning to Reduce Short Term Risk. The study will examine the effectiveness of the Safety Planning Intervention (SPI) in emergency departments. SPI is a tool that provides those experiencing suicidal ideation with a specific set of concrete strategies to help decrease the risk of suicidal behavior.   It was initially used to help adolescents manage their suicidal behavior while waiting for medication in a treatment study, and later for reducing suicide risk among veterans seeking treatment at the Veterans Health Administration.

It is Brown and Stanley’s mutual hope that using the simple Safety Plan, which involves patients working together with their treatment provider to recognize their own warning signs and coping strategies, and establishing when and who to reach out to for help, can be a tool for saving lives for those who are seen in the emergency departments for suicidal ideation and behavior.

About AFSP Research Grants

In 2017, AFSP invested a total of $4.65 Million Dollars in 27 new research grants. AFSP is the largest private funder of suicide research. Our Scientific Council helps set the national research agenda.

Of those grants, two are Focus Grants, totaling nearly $2 million.

Over the past 5 years, AFSP has awarded $18.8 million.

Over the past 10 years, AFSP has awarded $26.5 million.

AFSP’s research grants cover a broad range of categories including:

NEUROBIOLOGICAL: How do brain structure and neurochemical function contribute to suicide?

PSYCHOSOCIAL: What are the risk factors and warning signs for suicide?

GENETIC: What genetic pathways are associated with suicide risk, and can we develop biological interventions and treatments?

TREATMENT: What treatments — like therapies and medications — are effective at reducing suicide?

COMMUNITY: What universal prevention programs — like hotlines, gatekeeper training, and community-based programs — are the most effective?

LOSS SURVIVORS: What is the impact of suicide loss, and what helps the healing process?

Volunteer Spotlight

Research Study: Using Mobile Technology to Reduce Suicide Risk in Physicians

This year, AFSP awarded Drs. Constance Guille of the Medical University of South Carolina and Srijan Sen of the University of Michigan a Linked Standard Research Grant for $300,000 to study the use of mobile technology to reduce suicide risk in physicians. Many don’t realize that physicians have higher rates of burnout, depressive symptoms, and suicide risk than the general population, and suicide ideation among training physicians and interns is on the rise. It’s estimated that one physician dies by suicide every day and very few seek mental health treatment.

The study evaluates the use of Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) delivered via mobile technology, with medical interns providing daily ratings of mood via a mobile app, and receiving feedback about factors that may be contributing to their worsening of mood. Interns receive recommendations for engaging the CBT app during times of worsening ratings, which are measured using well-validated suicide rating scales. These results will be compared to interns in usual clinical care.

The use of mobile technologies in providing support may represent a critical gap – and an essential next step – in the reduction of suicide in training physicians, as it breaks down common barriers to support such as time, convenience, acceptability, and problem management. If successful, the results of the study could have a rippling effect in delivering effective care to the general population.

Dr. Sen is a shining example of AFSP’s cultivation of researchers over time. In 2009 he was the recipient of AFSP’s Young Investigator Grant, for a study that demonstrated medical interns often develop increased rates of depressed mood and suicidal ideation during their first three months of internship. In that earlier study, Dr. Sen also established that interns are willing to use web-based mobile interventions to help with depression.

About Out of the Darkness Community Walks

Many people affected by suicide first learn of AFSP through the Out of the Darkness Walks. When the walks first began in 2004, few people attended. This year, over 260,000 people participated in over 550 walks across the country.

The Out of the Darkness Walks are AFSP’s largest fundraising effort, and this year was no exception, with over $22 million raised for research, education, advocacy, and support programs.

The core of the Out of the Darkness Walks, the Community Walks created a movement. Held in hundreds of cities across the country, they give people the courage to open up about their own struggle or loss, and the platform to change our culture’s approach to mental health. This year we held over 400 walks, covering all 50 states and raised $17.5M with more than 280,000 individuals walking or donating to the cause.

Volunteer Spotlight

Bringing Suicide Prevention to the Prison Community

This past May, AFSP’s Oregon chapter held the first ever Out of the Darkness Walk in the country to take place inside a state prison, at Santaim Correctional Institution.

The walk was sponsored in conjunction with the Salem, Oregon Community Walk, and preceded a day before by an AFSP Talk Saves Lives™ education program, with 97 inmates – almost 25 percent of the entire inmate population – in attendance.

A report published recently by the U.S Department of Justice revealed that people incarcerated in state prisons died by suicide at a rate of 20 per 100,000 in 2014 … an increase of 30 percent from the previous year.

Adults in custody, as well as prison staff, together raised a combined $3,163 dollars for suicide prevention. The walk was organized by George Skurtu, an inmate whose father died by suicide, and who was released from custody just a few short weeks after the walk.

“In January of 2010, at the age of 22, I was arrested. Six months later, I was sentenced to 90 months in prison in the state of Oregon.

“During my incarceration, I decided prison wasn’t the legacy I wanted to leave behind.

“Looking back at my life, I realized how much suicide had affected my life.

“In 1990, when I was two years old and my sister was seven, my father, Ronald Skurtu, died by suicide. Growing up, I was oblivious to how my father died. One day, when I was about 16, my older sister randomly said, ‘I think you are old enough to know now. Dad didn’t die in a car accident. He died by suicide.’

“Finding out what really happened to my father left me confused, but it never occurred to me to seek out counsel or support. For years, I carried around the weight of these feelings and did not talk about them.

“I realized that my purpose was to help with suicide prevention efforts and provide support to those left behind by suicide.

“I was told about AFSP’s Community Walks by a staff member. Watching an Out of the Darkness Walks video online and realizing how many people are affected by suicide, I broke down and cried in my supervisor’s office. I wrote a proposal, presented it to management of the facility, and organized the event.

“I have found great purpose and fulfillment in helping others who have been affected by mood disorders, depression, incarceration, and suicide, just as I have been affected. This is the gift I am giving back.”

About Out of the Darkness Campus Walks

High school and college students across the country help raises awareness among their peers and local communities through AFSP’s Campus Walks, the fastest growing of AFSP’s walk events.

Nearly 30,000 people participated in Campus Walks this year alone, helping to foster an understanding of understanding, support and healing, and representing the future of mental health and suicide prevention.

Volunteer Spotlight

Walking on Campus at Suffolk County Community College

Anne Deubel is a 20-year-old student who has been participating in AFSP’s Out of the Darkness Walks since she was 14 years old. This year she organized the first ever Campus Walk on Long Island.

How did you first get involved with AFSP?

I truly believe it was an act of fate. When I was 14, I received a Facebook message from a family friend who was attending the 2011 Out of the Darkness Community Walk near me in Long Island. I attended to catch up with them. I was so inspired by the experience, that I reached out to my local chapter, and joined the committee to help plan the following walk!

It was during this time, as I became more educated about mental health, that I began to identify some of the common warning signs in my own thought processes – something I had experienced since I was younger. After a conversation with an older cousin, who received her PhD in developmental psychology, I began receiving treatment and learning coping skills throughout high school and college.

How did your involvement shift from helping to organize the walks to becoming a board member of the Long Island chapter?

Two years ago, I lost my aunt to mental illness. Already being involved with AFSP, I was surrounded by understanding and support. It also infused my volunteer work for AFSP with even more meaning. So my commitment to AFSP naturally grew.

I was invited to AFSP’s Chapter Leadership Conference, a once-a-year event in which volunteers and staff come together from across the country to share their experiences and learn how to have the most impact on their communities. That level of trust empowered me with confidence about my potential.

As a board member now for the Long Island chapter, my responsibilities include volunteer engagement and coordination, small third-party events, social media, and campus walks. I also speak at events sometimes as well about my own personal experience.

This past year, you organized the first ever Campus Walk on Long Island. What inspired you to make that happen?

I was in my second year as a student at Suffolk County Community College. I had done a group project for one of my [psychology?] classes in which I identified psychological stressors that were unique to many community college students, and needed to propose a solution. Naturally, I decided to plan an AFSP Campus Walk for my own school!

I was hoping in arranging for the Campus Walk to show other students that they are not alone in their struggle, and expose them to mental health education and help-seeking behaviors.

What actually went into setting up and organizing the walk? Were there any particular challenges?

My first step was visiting the counseling center. I knew they had an interest in helping students who struggled and encouraging positive mental health. We met once a week, figuring out which forms the campus would require: fundraising forms, speaker forms, meetings with security, approval from the grounds…it was a lot more than I was expecting! I also partnered with the Honors Club, which helped me set up training for our volunteers.

How did the event go?

We were really astounded by the turnout – over 200 walkers – and we raised over $11,000!

Being able to reach a community closer to Eastern Long Island was a big deal for us – the closest Community Walk is over an hour drive from the campus. Introducing AFSP to the community and giving a platform for suicide prevention truly was impactful.

What’s next? Do you hope to organize more walks in the community?

Right now, my major goal is to focus on the Campus Walks. We have a LOT of colleges in the area, and I would love to have an event on most (dare I say all?) campuses.

What personal meaning does your work with AFSP have for you, in light of how you first became involved and anything you’ve experience since?

When I began volunteering, I thought it would be a thing I would do with the spare time between clubs in high school. If you asked me about suicide 10 years ago, you would have been met with a blank stare. My involvement with AFSP has allowed me to become a more empathetic person in a very cynical world. It has empowered me in regard to my own mental health. It has given me an understanding support system in the wake of loss.

I’ve decided this is going to be my future in some way. I’m considering going into research, particularly in the field of neurology. The brain is an astounding organ impacting so much of our quality of life – it deserves more intense research and expansion.

About State Capitol Days

This year, State Capitol Day events were held in 32 states, up from 22 last year. Our voices are being heard: lawmakers passed and signed into law 13 state bills that AFSP had highlighted as top priorities at our State Capitol Day events.

The annual AFSP State Capitol Days bring advocates together to educate public officials about suicide prevention and discuss how legislators can help to reduce suicide in their states and communities.

This year, AFSP volunteers successfully advocated for passage of 4 new school suicide prevention laws.  A total of 27 states require suicide prevention training for school personnel, and now 15 states require school districts to have suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention policies in place.

In addition, AFSP volunteers successfully advocated for passage of 5 new laws increasing awareness of and access to suicide prevention and mental health resources on college and university campuses and 7 state bills to expand suicide prevention programming and crisis line access statewide.

 

Volunteer Spotlight

Suicide Prevention in Alaska

Jim Biela works as a school social worker in rural Native Alaskan villages. He has been involved with AFSP since 2009. This year, he brought advocates to Juneau for Alaska’s first AFSP State Capitol Day, a three-day-long event which included individual meetings with legislators, the governor and lieutenant governor, as well as a presentation of AFSP’s Talk Saves Lives™ education program, which was broadcast across the state. He was named AFSP’s Field Advocate of the Year.

Here, he tells us about his remarkable efforts to bring suicide prevention to his unique community.

When did you first move to Alaska?

I moved to Bethel, Alaska in 2003.  Bethel is located in the southwest part of Alaska – 400 air miles from Anchorage.  We measure by air miles because the only way to get to Bethel is by air. There are no roads to the southwest.  Bethel is the hub village of 56 surrounding villages where populations range from 100 to 700 Alaskan Natives – also known as Yupik. The school district I work for as an itinerant school social worker has 26 villages and is roughly the size of West Virginia. I am assigned to six remote villages, on different islands, five of which are on the coast of the Bering Sea.

The only way to the villages is by air. Once the plane lands on the dirt airstrip, I get into either a boat, snow machine, or ATV to get to the school. I am usually in the villages for a period of four to six days.  There are no hotels, so I live in the schools. I purchased a sleeping bag and cot for each of my sites.

Winters can be bad here. The coldest winter was -70 with wind-chill. The snow was so high that if you walked outside, you would be walking on top of houses. The schools are the only buildings in the village that have running water or hot showers. Most of the villagers will come to take a maqii (hot steam).

I have worked in these communities long enough that I get invited to people’s homes for native food, which includes seal soup, moose stew, bird soup, and reindeer chili. The folks here are dependent on subsistence hunting, so fresh meat from moose, caribou, reindeer, seal, or even whale is often served. I have grown to love the food.

I attend tribal meetings to give updates on issues the tribal leaders may not know of. I also hold village gatherings to present on topics that the community would like to hear. Most of the time it is a suicide prevention presentation.

How did you first get involved in AFSP?

On April 28, 2009 my friend Cang died by suicide. After his death I wanted to do more for suicide prevention. I started an AFSP chapter here in Alaska. In March of 2010, I was invited to attend my first AFSP Advocacy Forum in Washington D.C. While at the event, I was able to mingle and talk to lawmakers about the large number of suicides here in Alaska.

What kind of special considerations come into play for suicide prevention in Alaska?

Since Bethel is the hub of 56 villages, the hospital is here. The villages have clinics, but budget cuts have forced them to lay off most of the behavioral health aides. There are no mental health workers in the villages. Insurance for mental health is complicated. We do referrals, but the person has to fly into Bethel for the initial intake, and neither Medicaid nor the local Denali insurance will cover the first trip.

When prescribed medication has run out in the village, it can take up to 7-14 days to get them refilled and sent by air. In addition, the Native culture does not believe in medication for mental health, and often parents take their children off the medication upon their return.

Could you give us a brief overview of your work for AFSP in Alaska?

Our district is unique; the school board had mandated for social workers to present to all 7-12th graders on suicide prevention every year. I was able to adjust that to twice a year. We alternate between different AFSP education presentations, such as Talk Saves Lives™ and More Than Sad.

I invited AFSP’s Vice President of Research, Dr. Jill Harkavy-Friedman to come to Alaska. She was introduced to families who talked to her about mental health in rural Alaska. She learned a lot of what a village in rural Alaska is like and the obstacles we face out here.

I started the first Survivor Day event here in Toksook Bay 2013. The outpouring of help from the student government was great. I advised them that I wanted to honor their culture and traditions while getting across a message of hope and healing. The student government made up posters by hand and put them up at the post office and the two small stores we have in the village. Letters were hand-delivered to each home in both English and Yupik. The day of the event, we flew in an interpreter for the elders.

 

The event followed a memorial feast, where families brought in food for the buffet – salmon, seal soup, walrus, bird soup, moose stew, akutaq (Yupik ice cream)…in addition to pizza and spaghetti.

Following the memorial feast, traditional dancers performed Yuraq, a traditional Eskimo-style dancing performed to songs in Yupik. The dance is performed as a way of celebrating life.

After that first year, we have continued to host the annual Survivor Day event in Toksook Bay, and it has now spread to other villages. We have even arranged for Yugtun (Yupik language) closed-captioning for AFSP’s Survivor Day film, The Journey. This is difficult, since some English words do not exist in Yugtun.

Tell us about your advocacy efforts. 

Shortly after establishing the AFSP chapter here, I was one of several people who pushed for the SB137 (Jason Flatt Act) in Alaska, under which all teachers are required to have annual suicide prevention training.  As a field ambassador, I write letters-to-the-editor of our local newspaper that gets sent to over 56 villages. I also stay in touch with Senator Murkowski, Senator Sullivan, and Representative Young about suicide prevention in rural Alaska.

Currently I am watching what happens to the Affordable Care Act. Cutting Medicaid would be a disaster for the native population. I would like to see more funding for mental health in rural Alaska. We need more clinicians to travel to the villages. I would like to see more school districts mandate suicide prevention training to all 6-12 graders. Young people talk to each other more than they do to their elders – we need them to be more aware of the warning signs for suicide.

What are your hopes for the future, when it comes to suicide prevention in Alaska? 

On average, there is a suicide every other day here. I would like to see no suicides.

I have been with AFSP for seven years now. Each year, the meaning of my work has grown. Joining AFSP has been like joining a family with one goal and mission. The advocacy work I do, and my close relationship with our state and federal officials, is vital to this mission.

About State Capitol Days

The annual AFSP State Capitol Days bring advocates together to educate public officials about suicide prevention and discuss how legislators can help to reduce suicide in their states and communities. This year, State Capitol Day events were held in 32 states, up from 22 last year. Our voices are being heard: lawmakers passed and signed into law 13 state bills that AFSP had highlighted as top priorities at our State Capitol Day events.

This year, AFSP volunteers successfully advocated for passage of 4 new school suicide prevention laws.  A total of 27 states require suicide prevention training for school personnel, and now 15 states require school districts to have suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention policies in place.

In addition, AFSP volunteers successfully advocated for passage of 5 new laws increasing awareness of and access to suicide prevention and mental health resources on college and university campuses and 7 state bills to expand suicide prevention programming and crisis line access statewide.

 

Volunteer Spotlight

Patrick and Jackie Kimmel are Advocating for Smart Mental Health Policies in Pennsylvania

Patrick and Jackie Kimmel lost their young son Jacob to suicide in 2010. After attending one of AFSP’s Survivor Day events, they decided to volunteer for their local chapter.

They have since gone on to co-chair their chapter’s advocacy committee, and have been instrumental in AFSP’s political advocacy work in Western Pennsylvania, making great strides this past year.

What types of policies are you advocating for?

We’re advocating for policies supporting mental health parity – meaning that mental health conditions should be covered in the same way as physical health conditions – and increased funding for suicide prevention.

What kinds of things do you do to aid AFSP’s advocacy work?

We have met with various legislators and their staff at the state and federal level to educate them about who AFSP is, the organization’s public policy priorities in preventing suicide, what legislation AFSP supports in that effort, and how AFSP can help in their local community.

Locally throughout the Western Pennsylvania Chapter area, we and other chapter volunteers table at various community events such as mental health conferences, community walks, veteran’s forums, PRIDE Fest, and college fairs. Our objective is to inform the public about how fundraising provides money for research, education programs, political advocacy, and community support programs for mental health and suicide prevention.

What successes have you had?

We have established political advocacy as one of the priorities for the Western Pennsylvania Chapter of AFSP. We have organized and scheduled legislative appointments during AFSP advocacy events in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C. for advocates throughout Pennsylvania to meet with representatives. As a result of traveling to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C. the last two years, we have developed a rapport with certain legislators and their staff.

We have also been fortunate to develop a collaborative relationship with state Representative Dan Miller from the 42nd Pennsylvania Legislative District. In April of 2016 we met with him on Pennsylvania State Capitol Day. During our meeting he shared with us a bill he was in the process of writing that would require middle school students to have a depression screening along with other medical check-ups. Rep. Miller adjusted language in the proposal based on our input. We then put him in touch with AFSP’s Public Policy office in Washington D.C. to discuss his bill and how AFSP could provide support for its passage in Pennsylvania.

In March of this year, to help support Representative Miller’s depression screening bill, Patrick gave testimony before a fourteen member Pennsylvania congressional panel. In doing so, he shared our personal story of losing our son to suicide. Being open about these types of experiences has helped to make people realize how important the cause is, and that many, many people in our country have a personal connection to suicide.

We’ve also had the opportunity to talk about our advocacy work on local TV stations and newspapers, drawing attention to our cause. After one of these TV appearances, we were contacted by Pennsylvania Senator Pat Toomey’s legislative director, to congratulate us. This is important because it shows AFSP is becoming a recognized name in Washington D.C.

What does your work with AFSP and suicide prevention advocacy represent to you, personally, in light of your loss?

We believe that our passion, enthusiasm, and professionalism in pursuing advocacy for AFSP have been our greatest strengths. We’re not very technologically skilled, so we weren’t sure how much we could accomplish at first. But volunteering in this way has given us the opportunity to fight back against suicide, make a difference, and most importantly, honor our son, Jacob.

About ISP

Listed in the Best Practice Registry for Suicide Prevention, the Interactive Screening Program (ISP) is an online program being used by 110 college and university counseling centers, medical and professional degree schools, hospital networks, corporations and Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs), connecting thousands of people to help they would not have sought otherwise.

Volunteer Spotlight

Working with Police to Curb Suicide Within the Ranks

In 2006, one of the officers who was a member of the Massachusetts Coalition of Police (MASS C.O.P.) died by suicide. He was afraid to seek help because he didn’t want to lose his badge.

This year, MASS C.O.P. President Scott Hovsepian announced that his union, which represents nearly 4,300 police officers in Massachusetts, would be instituting AFSP’s Interactive Screening Program, a Self-Check Quiz to reach distressed police officers and help connect them to peer support officers and mental health services before a crisis emerges.

“If this can save one life, it is money, time, and energy well spent,” said Hovsepian, a 23 year police officer for the city of Waltham, MA. “You can’t put a price on a life. If we had had this program in place, we might not have lost our colleague to suicide in 2006. I want police officers nationwide to know that there are tools like the Self-Check Quiz that can help them through the hard times.

AFSP’s Interactive Screening Program is used by institutions of higher education, workplaces, law enforcement agencies, and Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) to reach distressed people and help connect them to mental health services before a crisis emerges.

“We are honored to be partnering with MASS C.O.P. to offer the Self-Check Quiz to its members,” said Dr. Christine Moutier, AFSP chief medical officer. “Police officers are accustomed to servicing others, and this is a way for them to ensure they stay healthy and strong. Seeking help for your mental health is the brave thing to do.”

About Stronger Communities: LGBTQ+ Suicide Prevention

Stronger Communities: LGBTQ+ Suicide Prevention is a full-day conference sponsored by a local chapter of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. The goal is to raise awareness about LGBTQ+ suicide risk, bring research findings to the attention of professionals and the public, and explore strategies for LGBTQ+ suicide prevention in local communities. The agenda includes plenary and breakout sessions that feature national and local experts on LGBTQ+ mental health and suicide risk and will be focused on making mental health, suicide prevention, and education an LGBTQ+ community priority.

Volunteer Spotlight

Making Suicide Prevention a Priority in the LGBTQ+ Community

This past April, AFSP’s Eastern Missouri Chapter hosted Stronger Communities: LGBTQ+ Suicide Prevention, a day-long conference designed to raise awareness about LGBT suicide risk, share research findings, and explore strategies for LGBT suicide prevention in local communities.

Phyllis Blackwelder, chair of the local AFSP chapter who organized the event, explains why she felt the conference was so important.

“A few years ago, other AFSP volunteers and I started attending the local St. Louis Pride Festival. We set up a table featuring suicide prevention resources and information. I can’t begin to tell you how many people came up to us and said that AFSP was the reason they were still alive. It humbled me. This issue hit home for me personally at the time, because a friend of my step-daughter – a gay teenager not accepted by his family – had recently died by suicide.

It also inspired us to provide more education to both local mental health professionals and residents in our area about topics related to the LGBTQ+ community. We decided to bring this event to St. Louis.

The conference was a huge success. Local and national experts came and shared their expertise. We got a lot of personal notes from attendees thanking us and saying how much they had learned.

There is a big need for this program right now, and it’s just one example of how AFSP’s education materials can be adapted for particular populations of people.”

About It's Real

Over 550 It’s Real: College Students and Mental Health videos were sold, and more than 20 free community presentations were held, in the first three months after its launch in April 2017.

More about It’s Real

For many, college is a time of maturation, transition and growth, but can also come with great emotional challenge. This 17-minute film follows the journey of six students who wrestled with mental health concerns, sought treatment, made their psychological well-being a top priority, and found their own new sense of balance. The film has an accompanying five-minute expert commentary and a facilitator’s guide to support its use in educational programming. The film is available as a DVD or in digital download formats, and includes a Facilitator Guide to help lead discussion

Volunteer Spotlight

Angela M. Stowe & It’s Real at the University of Alabama at Birmingham

Angela Stowe, Director of Student Counseling Services and Wellness Promotion at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, oversaw the presentation of the AFSP-produced documentary It’s Real: College Students and Mental Health on her campus this past year.

It’s Real features the stories of six college students from across the country. Designed to raise awareness about mental health issues commonly experienced by students, the film is intended to be used as part of a school’s educational program to encourage help-seeking.

By featuring real stories and experiences, the film conveys that depression and other mental health conditions are real illnesses that can be managed through specific treatments and interventions. It encourages students to be mindful of the state of their mental health, to acknowledge and recognize when they are struggling, and to take steps to seek help.

“College students face significant challenges around anxiety, loneliness, isolation, relationships, and just life management in general. They also have a significant amount of trauma, we’ve seen.

We’ve trained over 200 students, faculty and staff since July. The film has been a terrific conversation starter and a really wonderful way to frame the discussion about suicide and our college students. Those who attend leave with a better understanding of how to recognize, understand and support students who may be at risk for suicide.”

About Talk Saves Lives™

Talk Saves Lives™: An Introduction to Suicide Prevention is a free community-based presentation that covers the general scope of suicide, the research on prevention, and what people can do to fight suicide. Attendees learn what suicide is; who it affects; what we know about it; the risk and warning signs of suicide; and how together, we can help prevent it.

Since TSL launched, the program has reach more than 33,000 people. Special modules of Talk Saves Lives have been made available to help us reach special populations, such as Seniors, LGBTQ+ individuals, and firearms owners.

Volunteer Spotlight

Talk Saves Lives™ and the New York Police Department

Both AFSP and The NYPD are dedicated to helping people in crisis. This past year, AFSP collaborated with the New York Police Department on a number of initiatives, all designed to keep people safe, including AFSP’s educational program, Talk Saves Lives™: An Introduction to Suicide Prevention.

Detective Jeff Thompson, NYPD, Strategic and Crisis Communication, was involved with this growing partnership from the very beginning, and as it continues to expand.

How did the NYPD’s collaboration with AFSP come about? Had you noticed a specific need?

The connection first started when the NYPD created a Twitter account — @TalkToMe — to help share information on mental illness, share crisis communication skills, and connect people with services. We then wanted to connect with the suicide prevention and mental health community for further expertise. AFSP was our first stop!

Are there any special considerations regarding mental health and suicide prevention for police?

Often, police officers get called when the situation is tense, emotionally driven, unpredictable, and potentially violent. We are there to help the person, and it can be very complicated, because the person does not always realize that.

For someone who is despondent or potentially suicidal, we are there when they may be having the worst moment of their life. Based on the elite training our officers get, we try to dispel the person’s feelings of being alone, that the situation is hopeless, and that there are no options. The officers’ approach is grounded in using active listening skills to slow the situation down, de-escalate tense and negative emotions, demonstrate empathy, and build rapport in order achieve a peaceful resolution.

What exactly has the collaboration consisted of?

The work between the NYPD and the AFSP consists of various collaborations. It started with social media and progressed to many other in-person activities. This includes someone from AFSP’s New York chapter speaking at precinct roll-calls to address officers just prior to going out on patrol; creating joint public service announcements that have been used locally and nationally; and developing handout material for officers to provide them with tips on what to say (and avoid saying) when engaging a suicidal person.

AFSP’s Talk Saves Lives™ has been presented at numerous local, precinct-level community council meetings where guest speakers are often invited. This provided a perfect partnership between the NYPD and AFSP. Special handouts were provided to the attendees so they would have even more information at their fingertips.

Recently, AFSP has also been providing insight on an NYPD internal project that seeks to reduce police officer suicide. Dr. Christine Moutier, AFSP’s Chief Medical Officer, has also filmed a pair of videos for the law enforcement audience with the NYPD. The practical guidance provided by AFSP has helped ensure that NYPD outreach is conducted effectively and based on best practices.

We look forward to continuing and expanding our collaboration, and are more than willing to connect and share this with other police departments across the country.

About Talk Saves Lives™

Talk Saves Lives™: An Introduction to Suicide Prevention is a free community-based presentation that covers the general scope of suicide, the research on prevention, and what people can do to fight suicide. Attendees learn what suicide is; who it affects; what we know about it; the risk and warning signs of suicide; and how together, we can help prevent it.

Since TSL launched, the program has reach more than 33,000 people. Special modules of Talk Saves Lives have been made available to help us reach special populations, such as Seniors, LGBTQ+ individuals, and firearms owners.

Volunteer Spotlight

Denisse Lamas delivers Talk Saves Lives™ in Spanish

Denisse Lamas is a licensed clinical social worker who has volunteered with AFSP’s Central Florida Chapter since 2009. This past year, in an effort to reach Florida’s Hispanic population and bring much needed suicide prevention training to the community, she began presenting AFSP’s educational program Talk Saves Lives™ in Spanish.

How did you first get involved at AFSP?

I was the Suicide Prevention counselor for Orange County Public Schools. One of the founding members of AFSP’s Central Florida chapter reached out to me about attending chapter board meetings so that we could learn from each other. At that moment, I realized the huge stigma associated with suicide and I wanted to do something about it.

Had you noticed a specific need for this program?

Yes. Hispanics are one of the largest and fastest growing populations in Central Florida and there is also a large stigma surrounding mental health and suicide in the Hispanic population. I’ve been especially focused on providing mental health education to Florida’s Hispanic population in the aftermath of the PULSE night club shooting in Orlando.

Are there any special considerations regarding mental health and suicide prevention for the Spanish-speaking audience?

Cultural competency is important. All Hispanics/ Latinos have different cultures that play a role in their upbringing. Spanish is spoken differently in different countries and the same word may have different meanings in different countries. It’s great to be able to offer AFSP’s Talk Saves Lives™ program not just in Spanish, but weaving these important cultural considerations into the presentation. 

Were there any particular challenges in arranging for the program?

I was concerned about attendance, because people – especially in this community – are not accustomed to openly talking about these topics. However, there are people who realize they need this training, both for themselves and to help others recognize common warning signs and become aware of practical ways to prevent suicide. We held the Talk Saves Lives™ program on several occasions in both English and in Spanish, and to my surprise, the Spanish version was more attended than the English version!

How did it go?

People asked so many questions that I learned to expect an active Q&A session! This shows how hungry people are for suicide prevention education. It all went so well that I was able to provide the program not only in Central Florida, but in Rhode Island and Puerto Rico.

What are your hopes for building on this success in the future?

Every time I offer this program, more people attend! I have also now been invited to offer the Talk Saves Lives program in churches, which is another environment in which I hope to encourage more openness about the topic of suicide prevention and mental health.

I hope that Talk Saves Lives™ is presented more frequently in Spanish and that we can continue to reach more and more people.

About Out of the Darkness Community Walks

Many people affected by suicide first learn of AFSP through the Out of the Darkness Walks. When the walks first began in 2004, few people attended. This year, over 260,000 people participated in over 550 walks across the country.

The Out of the Darkness Walks are AFSP’s largest fundraising effort, and this year was no exception, with over $22 million raised for research, education, advocacy, and support programs.

The core of the Out of the Darkness Walks, the Community Walks created a movement. Held in hundreds of cities across the country, they give people the courage to open up about their own struggle or loss, and the platform to change our culture’s approach to mental health. This year we held over 400 walks, covering all 50 states and raised $17.5M with more than 280,000 individuals walking or donating to the cause.

Volunteer Spotlight

Walking Out of the Darkness in the Bay Area

Sarah Heraldo first began volunteering for AFSP as a college student, despite having no direct connection to suicide. She has helped organize Out of the Darkness Community Walks in the Bay Area for the last several years.

How did you first get involved with AFSP?

I first got involved with the AFSP through volunteering for the San Francisco Out of the Darkness Walk. My fiancé, Robin Lopez, attended the walks for years and even spoke at the Overnight in 2012 after the death of his best friend, Mark. Robin and I were both actively involved in a community service organization on our college campus. He reached out to his local AFSP chapter to ask if some of our college friends could volunteer for the walk. That was how I first became involved with AFSP. I have no direct connection to suicide, but its impact on my loved ones has definitely changed my own life.

In what ways have you been involved over the years?

I took the opportunity to create an Out of the Darkness Walks Committee within our campus organization. My main goal was to reach college students and educate them about suicide prevention and work together to erase the stigma that sometimes still exists around mental health. We arranged a speaker through AFSP, and hosted a Talk Saves Lives™ event, which over 70 students attended!

What have you been up to this year?

After graduating college, I moved back to San Jose, my hometown, and joined the South Bay Out of the Darkness Walks Committee. I’m particularly interested in reaching a younger demographic of people – particularly students in elementary, middle school, high school, and college. On the committee, I act as Outreach Coordinator and Walk Day Lead, working directly with volunteers along the walk route, giving them specific instructions, whether it’s cheering walkers on at specific points, or directing them along the walk route.

What does your work with AFSP mean to you, personally?

Although I have no direct connection to suicide, personally, suicide has affected my loved ones. It brings me sadness, but there is also joy in knowing there are organizations like AFSP that raise awareness and provide support and education. It’s a blessing to know there are others out there who understand and – literally, in the case of the Out of the Darkness Walks – stand in solidarity for the cause.

What changes in the world would you like to see as a result of your activities, particularly with the Walks? 

My primary career goal is to spread education about mental health and suicide prevention. In addition to staying involved in the walks, I’d like to help bring AFSP’s education programs to schools, because mental health is something that needs to be addressed early and dealt with head on.

My main goal with the Community Walks is to let people know there are people out where who know what others are going through, and working to reduce the suicide rate.

About Ride to Fight Suicide

The Fargo Ride to Fight Suicide was only one of many motorcycle rides held by AFSP chapters nationwide every year. Last year over 360 bikers participated in 11 rides, each contributing their voices to support research and education that saves lives. You can help the movement continue to grow by signing up for an event near you today.

Volunteer Spotlight

Getting Your Motors Running in Fargo, North Dakota

Tavia Smith found her path to hope and healing as a result of a random phone call. She has since become an integral part of her local chapter in Fargo, North Dakota. This year, she helped organize an AFSP Ride to Fight event, a motorcycle run dedicated to raising money for suicide awareness. 


How did you first get involved with AFSP?

About 10 years ago, I was at the bank where I work and happened to receive a phone call from AFSP’s local chapter, asking for support from the bank for the area’s very first Out of the Darkness Walk. I had lost both my father and grandfather to suicide over 20 years earlier. The person on the phone opened up about having recently lost her daughter to suicide and finding, prior to AFSP, that there was no support in our state for this type of loss.

I had never really talked to anyone about my loss due to shame and embarrassment. This phone call was the beginning of my journey toward healing, volunteerism, and of a very precious friendship.    

How did your area’s Ride to Fight event go?

My husband and I had our own motorcycles and wanted to organize a Ride to Fight event because we knew this would be a great group of people to involve in our cause. I had no idea how many people would attend, because bikers are not good at planning ahead and preregistering! I told myself I would be happy if 10 or more showed up. There were 65! 

At the beginning of the ride, we had a moment of silence. People came up to me to thank me for putting the event together, and many of them told me personal stories of why they felt it was important for them to be there.

In what other ways have you been involved in AFSP?

I helped organize that first Out of The Darkness Walk! I then assisted in starting a survivor support group which I still facilitate, thanks to training from AFSP. I’m currently a board member of my local chapter, am involved in the Survivor Outreach Program, and helped organize our first local Survivor Day event. I’m now in the process of equipping AFSP’s Interactive Screening Program for law enforcement and first responders departments across the North Dakota.

What has your involvement with AFSP come to mean for you, personally?

Each and every time I help a person who has lost someone to suicide, I feel an overwhelming emotion of honoring my dad. I also feel I am a role model for my three daughters. Our involvement with AFSP has helped teach them compassion and openness, and educated them as to how to keep others in our community safe.

About Hike for Hope

The Hike for Hope events encourage participants in local communities to hike to fight suicide and raise awareness about mental health. Hikers can be a part of the movement turning hope into action, and create a culture that’s smart about mental health. These hikes are truly uplifting experiences, and they grow every year.

Volunteer Spotlight

Hiking for Hope on Father’s Day

A group effort on the part of all involved with AFSP’s Colorado chapter, the Denver Hike for Hope took place on June 18 near the state’s Red Rock Amphitheater on the beautiful Trading Post Trail. The event was an opportunity for energetic participants to do something they love in a gorgeous, outdoor environment alongside others who have been touched by suicide.

This was the first year that one of AFSP’s Hike for Hope events was held in the area. Once locating the perfect venue, the big question was one of timing: they were offered only two possible dates, one of which was Father’s Day. “Could the event compete with a popular holiday?” the organizers wondered.

Their concerns were unfounded, and the Hike for Hope was an unparalleled success, attracting 185 participants, and raising over $10,000 for suicide prevention. Hoisting AFSP banners emblazoned with the popular #StopSuicide hashtag, many hikers felt particular significance in having the event take place on Father’s Day.

The 2018 Denver Hike for Hope event has already been scheduled, once again on the scenic Trading Post Trail…on Father’s Day.

About Chapter Events

This year, AFSP volunteers organized 85 Chapter Events in their local communities.

From motorcycle rides, to hiking, to running for Team AFSP in marathons and more, these are just some of the ways people raised both funds and awareness for the cause.

Volunteer Spotlight

Suicide is a Drag

For Rusty Lockett, growing up in rural Ohio, mental health was something rarely discussed – despite his family’s history of depression. Battling depression himself as early as fifth grade, Rusty attempted to take his life during his senior year of high school. Later, several friends – and his father – would die by suicide.

However, after getting help, Rusty began devoting his adult life to suicide prevention, eventually becoming involved in Cincinnati’s “Suicide is a Drag” event, aimed at the LGBT community. This past year marked the seventh time the fun – and meaningful – event was held.

Here, Rusty discusses his involvement.

“Through the ‘Suicide is a Drag’ event, I realized that fundraising for suicide prevention could be fun. The whole thing came to be as the result of a call of action between an AFSP chapter board member and a local drag queen. Targeted toward the LGBT (or LGBTQ2PIA) community, which comprises Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Trans*, Queer, Questioning, Pansexual, Intersexual, and Asexual individuals, the event combines suicide prevention education with a drag show. We invite partnering and complementing organizations to set up informational booths where they can talk to folks about their services. It’s informative, raises money, fosters community, and spreads awareness. It’s also a total blast.

Our goals with the event aren’t only to raise money for the cause, but to educate. This year, we changed the venue to Northern Kentucky University. We thought our usual patrons would follow us, and we wanted to reach out to a much younger generation; the college kids, their friends, and families. 

We couldn’t have put this event on – and make it everything we wanted it to be – alone. Not only did we partner with local mental health agencies as well as local LGBTQ+ organizations, we also worked with the LGBTQ+ Services office at Northern Kentucky University; an organization called Imperial Sovereign Queen City Court of the Buckeye Empire, for their knowledge of fundraising within the LGBTQ+ community. In all, we had more than 20 agencies and organizations participate. 

At one point during the event, a young trans* person introduced themselves – over the course of the conversation, it became apparent that this teen was at risk, and struggled. This event provided an opportunity to deal with it head on, and let them know it’s okay to be who you are. We were also able to put the teen in touch with local agencies and organizations to help them through the process. To me, this is really why we do it. 

Suicide is a hard story. Talking about it – and dealing with it – can be emotionally draining. Suicide is a Drag is an event at which there is laughter, cheer, and love. Through Suicide is a Drag and other events, I’ve learned how to share my story appropriately: without anger, but with passion and sensitivity.”

About Chapter Events

This year, AFSP volunteers organized 85 Chapter Events in their local communities.

From motorcycle rides, to hiking, to running for Team AFSP in marathons and more, these are just some of the ways people raised both funds and awareness for the cause.

Volunteer Spotlight

Lori Tanner and Team AFSP

Lori Tanner, a volunteer from Wyoming, took part in Team AFSP’s L.A. Marathon event this year, raising funds and awareness while finding meaning in the loss of her son.

“It’s something you never think would happen in your family. Not your child. My 17-year-old son Gavin took his life. I thought the world had stopped. It was gut wrenching to bury my son. To see how it affected my small community was heartbreaking. I was left with so many questions.

Two weeks before he died, He ran his first 5K. He asked me to run with him and of course I couldn’t. I wasn’t a runner! But I promised him I would run the next year with him. That would not happen.

But I remembered the promise I had made him. I decided to run for him, in the same 5K that he had run. I ran a 10K, then signed up for a half marathon. And I finished! This was close to two years after his death. I had NEVER been a runner.

I realized I needed to find a way to live again despite my deep grief. I had to find a way to accept that there would never be the answers I wanted.

I had participated in one of AFSP’s Out of the Darkness Walks; it had been the first one in my small town. I wanted to participate in another AFSP event. I saw the listing for the Team AFSP LA Marathon. I had never even been to L.A.!

I was terrified. A marathon!?! Me? Well, I wanted to do something BIG. I wanted to raise money. I wanted to run for my son. I signed up before I could change my mind.

I began training in the dead of winter in Wyoming. I endured long, cold, dark, lonely runs. I didn’t know anyone else to run with. I dedicated those cold runs to people suffering and considering suicide and those who have lost a loved one. I thought of my son. I just kept pushing forward.

I started connecting with my teammates through Facebook and email. Without their encouragement, I don’t think I would have made it. I didn’t want to let them down, or my sponsors who had donated.

I ran through several snowstorms.

I was so nervous as the date of the marathon approached. I got on the plane thinking, “I can’t do this.” I felt for sure I was going to fail.

I met my teammates in person at the team dinner. We all shared why we were running. It was so powerful to hear all their stories. I walked away not feeling alone anymore as a loss survivor.

I’m sure I didn’t sleep at all that night. I rode the bus to the Dodger’s stadium. I found my teammates. We all waited together.

During the race, we ran together. I thought of my son. My family showed up at mile six. As we kept running, our group separated naturally as we spread out.

At mile 22, I passed the AFSP booth and saw my family again, holding up signs and cheering me on. I was so exhausted. Everything hurt. I looked to my right and standing beside me was Traute Winters, AFSP’s Los Angeles Area Director. She said, “I’m here for you. I got you.” I suddenly felt so much lighter. For the first time, I thought, “I’m going to finish.” And I did, with Traute running alongside me until mile 23. I had done what I thought wasn’t possible.

I would love to have my son by my side. But that isn’t going to happen. What I can do is be that person now who shows up at mile 22 and says to someone else, “I got you.”

I can’t imagine enduring anything more painful in my life than losing my son. As long as I am living, I want my life and my son’s life to have mattered. I want to work toward suicide prevention and mental health awareness.  Running in the Team AFSP LA Marathon helped me find a way.

About Loss & Healing

AFSP offers programs and resources for healing as well as volunteer opportunities for survivors who find meaning in supporting their peers. Click here to see all that AFSP offers its suicide loss survivor community.

Volunteer Spotlight

Children, Teens and Suicide Loss

Young people who have lost a loved one to suicide grieve and understand a suicide death in a unique and complex way. This past year, AFSP collaborated with The Dougy Center: The National Center for Grieving Children and Families in Portland, Oregon to provide the most practical and proven guidance available for adults taking the lead in supporting these young loss survivors.

“Many families don’t receive the same kind of support after a suicide death that other families do following other types of deaths,” according to Donna L. Schuurman, Senior Director of Advocacy & Training, and Executive Director Emeritus, of The Dougy Center. “Because so many adults don’t know how to respond compassionately when a family member takes his or her life, the children often have more complex issues related to healthy grieving. When AFSP approached us to collaborate on this booklet, we jumped at the opportunity.”

The new Children, Teens, and Suicide Loss booklet, based in part on input from families who had participated in “Healing After a Suicide Death” support groups, combines AFSP’s wisdom on caring for those grieving a death by suicide with The Dougy Center’s long history of working with young people. The booklet provides insight on how young loss survivors experience and heal from a suicide death, and includes specific guidance on age-appropriate language to use when speaking about the loss. It has proven to be an invaluable resource not just for families, but for teachers, religious representatives, medical professionals, and other people who may come in contact with grieving families.

About International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day (Survivor Day)

Each year, AFSP hosts Survivor Day events in local communities around the world commemorating International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day. Those affected by suicide share stories, find comfort, and gain understanding.

More than 360 Survivor Day events took place in 2016. Each event included a screening of the AFSP-produced documentary Life Journeys: Reclaiming Life After Loss. Drawing on stories and insights from long-term loss survivors, the film shows us that through resilience and support we can achieve hope and understanding in our lives while celebrating the lives of those we lost.

Volunteer Spotlight

Survivor Day at Gallaudet University

Gallaudet University, the world’s only university designed for deaf and hard of hearing students, hosted its first Survivor Day event this past year. Often, the types of resources offered for those struggling with the loss of a loved one to suicide are not accessible to this community. Gallaudet’s Survivor Day presentations were presented using American Sign Language (ASL), and focused on special considerations involving deaf culture and the unique aspects of the Deaf community.

AFSP began collaborating with Gallaudet four years ago, in preparation for the school’s first Out of the Darkness Campus Walk, held in April 2015. Representatives from the university have since worked closely with AFSP to address issues of suicide prevention, education and support in the deaf and hard of hearing community.

Most recently, AFSP has worked hand-in-hand with the university’s counseling center to custom design a special module of AFSP’s Interactive Screening Program (ISP) that is accessible through both English and ASL. Gallaudet’s ISP installation has already begun reaching students who might otherwise not have sought out counseling services.

About the Survivor Outreach Program

The Survivor Outreach Program is now offered in 50 chapters across the United States, making visits from a trained volunteer who has lost someone to suicide available to anyone in the country via an in-person visit, by phone, or video chat.

More than 400 outreach visit requests were responded to in 2016, making this one of AFSP’s most rapidly expanding programs.

Volunteer Spotlight

Vanessa Bassett and the Survivor Outreach Program

Having lost her 32-year-old brother to suicide in 2013, Vanessa Bassett knows how healing it can be to connect survivors of suicide loss with others who’ve experienced the same type of loss. AFSP’s Survivor Outreach Program (SOP) does just that, connecting trained volunteers – the survivors of suicide loss themselves – to those who are grieving with an in-person visit, or by phone or video chat.

The program is available throughout the U.S., and under Bassett’s leadership, North Carolina’s SOP team is one of the most vibrant and full-fledged, with the largest group of volunteers. There were 1,406 deaths by suicide in North Carolina in 2016. As Bassett puts it, “With North Carolina being such a large state, the challenge isn’t just to supply need, but to spread word that the program exists.”

Providing SafeTALK training to enhance the normal required training of all SOP volunteers, Bassett and her team have also worked tirelessly to promote the program to those most likely to be involved when a suicide death occurs, such as police officers, firefighters, and funeral home associates.

“Many times, one of these professionals is the first person the family sees after the loss of their loved one. Making sure these frontline professionals know about the program ensures that the people most in need of this resource will find out it’s available to them.”

About The Out of the Darkness Overnight Walk

The Overnight is AFSP’s flagship event. Held this year in San Diego and Washington, D.C., the Overnight draws together thousands of people who walk over 16 miles from dusk to dawn to fight suicide. A powerful emotional event forging connections that last a lifetime, the Overnight sends the message that no one affected by suicide is alone.

This year’s events raised over $3,500,000 and included more than 2,500 participants!

Volunteer Spotlight

The Tong Family - San Diego's Overnight Walk

The Tong Family have been active participants in AFSP’s Out of the Darkness Overnight Walks ever since first participating in 2013, after the death of their son Evan. The San Diego Overnight, in May of this past year, was their fourth event.

Here, Barney Tong, Evan’s father, describes the meaning his whole family has found through their regular involvement in the Overnight, and how his role has evolved from walker to Team Captain.

It was hard to determine how we should feel and act after Evan’s death. In the beginning, we struggled to find our way through our own depression. Ever since our family walked in our first Overnight, we knew that this unforgettable experience was something we would continue to participate in. Before, during and after each Overnight, our family felt the gracious support from the AFSP staff, volunteers, and participants. We were touched by the abundant love provided by others affected by suicide. After the first Overnight in Seattle, we knew that there is hope and that we would find purpose through this tragedy. We learned that it’s ok to be happy. That it’s okay to laugh. And, it’s okay to grieve.

We have participated in four Overnight walks, Seattle, Boston, San Francisco, and San Diego. My wife Kathy and our daughter Nicole and I walked in Seattle and Boston. Since Kathy is a Family Nurse Practitioner, she volunteered on the medical team in San Francisco and San Diego.

Kathy and I were proud to hear that our daughter Nicole was chosen to be the closing speaker at The Overnight closing ceremonies in San Francisco. We knew she was hesitant to speak in front of a large crowd. We encouraged her to Be The Voice!  She did an awesome job of sharing how participating in The Overnight Walks influenced her life after her brother’s death. We were honored and humbled to be called onto the stage during her speech.

I served as Team Captain for our Orange County Chapter Team in the San Diego Overnight this year. The support we feel from everyone associated with AFSP really keeps us going. We want to raise awareness, remove the stigma, and provide hope to those affected by suicide. I will continue to fundraise and walk in The Overnight and Community Walks as long as I can walk.

Helping others heal is very healing for us.

About The Out of the Darkness Overnight Walk

The Overnight is AFSP’s flagship event. Held this year in San Diego and Washington, D.C., the Overnight draws together thousands of people who walk over 16 miles from dusk to dawn to fight suicide. A powerful emotional event forging connections that last a lifetime, the Overnight sends the message that no one affected by suicide is alone.

This year’s events raised over $3,500,000 and included more than 2,500 participants!

Volunteer Spotlight

Jane Singman - Washington, D.C.'s Overnight Walk

15-year-old Jane Singman of New Rochelle, New York lost her best friend Owen to suicide last year. Since then, she has raised over $41,000 for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, in part by participating in the Washington, D.C. Out of the Darkness Overnight Walk. Through this and other creative fundraising activities, Jane has increased awareness for the cause, finding meaning in the loss of her friend in the process.

Here, in her own words, Jane explains how her involvement with AFSP has helped her on her healing journey.

My best friend of ten years, Owen Kelly died by suicide on January 18, 2016. I was absolutely devastated. I wasn’t the only one to feel an extreme loss—Owen had many friends. There were over 1,000 people at his wake. My community was broken, and in mourning. I thought if I could start raising money for suicide prevention – if I could try to make sense of the awful thing that happened – people could begin to heal together. I read about the Out of the Darkness Overnight Walk, and thought it seemed incredibly powerful. I immediately wanted to be a part of it.

When I first began to fundraise, my goal was to help the people around me come to terms with suicide, and try to begin the healing process. I realized that suicide prevention was very important, not only within my small community, but also on a much bigger scale. I would never have even imagined being involved in suicide prevention if it hadn’t been for Owen, which is why I think it’s so important to educate and spread awareness: people don’t think of suicide as something that will ever affect them, until it does. It’s so important to get to the root of the problem before it’s too late.

At first, I had a very small goal. I wanted to raise $1,000. I started fundraising in April, and the walk was in June, so I knew I only had about two months to reach my goal. I didn’t know how to fundraise, had no real prior experience, and didn’t expect people to be so generous. I raised $24,000. $17,000 was through an online campaign in which I shared my story and asked others to share it as well. $1,000 was raised through two school bake sales; another $1,500 was raised through a car wash. The rest of the money was raised by my teammates. When I achieved 24 times the amount of my original goal, I was surprised beyond belief.

At the beginning of the next school year, as a junior, I asked my principal if I could start my own suicide prevention club. Over 100 people signed up. Together, we raised $13,000: $7,000 for AFSP’s Westchester County Walk in 2016, and $6,000 through a dance-a-thon. My classmates and the school administration were ready and eager to help me.

I now run the social media account for AFSP’s Westchester chapter. I fundraise throughout the year, and spread awareness about suicide in my group of friends, my school, and the community as a whole. In total, I have raised $41,000 since April of 2016.

I feel like my efforts have honored Owen in a great way. Suicide is preventable, treatable, and swept under the rug in America. I will not allow my friend Owen to be swept under the rug.

A lot of my friends were very close with Owen, and we all struggled with his death. Coming together to raise awareness about mental health and suicide prevention has helped us all put our own pieces back together, with the hopes that what happened to Owen will never have to happen to anyone else.

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